Follow us:

All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

January 7, 2009 at 9:17 AM

Maximus pantry for Minimalist New Year: what’s in yours?

In today’s New York Times, “The Minimalist” Mark Bittman brings home a point that became all too clear to me during our recent “Storm Watch: 2008!” when I, like so many of you, hunkered down at home and cooked. During that lengthy home-‘n-hang I turned to my fridge and pantry with considerable more interest than usual, to keep from having to de-ice-and-snow the car or walk in (ankle-) deep snow to get to the market for provisions.

Using ingredients I had on hand I made soup. And turned to my larder for homegrown potatoes to eat with that comfort-food specialty, roast chicken. I also baked many loaves of the Bread Recipe That Roared (thanks again, Bittman!). I even delved into my notorious downstairs freezer for inspiration.

So this morning, when I saw the photo accompanying The Minimalist’s story “Fresh Start for a New Year? Let’s Begin in the Kitchen” and read what he had to say about the literal “ins” and “outs” regarding cooking essentials, I immediately wanted to share it with you. And here’s why:

Point by point I emphatically agree with The Minimalist — with one exception. He says out with the packaged bread crumbs, I say packaged panko rules! And, what do you know: I wasn’t at all surprised to find that my larder could pose as the poster-child to back up his kitchen philosophy:

What Bittman said, in a nutshell (or, as we say in the business, a nut graf), is “if your goal is to cook and cook quickly, to get a satisfying and enjoyable variety of real food on the table as often as possible, a well-stocked pantry and fridge can sustain you.” Damn straight.

So read it, then eat it. And tell me: what fridge and pantry staples are a must-have in your house?

Comments | More in Cooking | Topics: Reading about eating

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►