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All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

May 13, 2009 at 7:07 AM

Noodle sandwich? You’re kidding, right?

What’s that old saw about x-many-times makes a trend? A couple weeks ago, the kid and I were in Uwajimaya giving the hungry-eyeball to the MREs in the refrigerated case, when what to our wondering eyes should appear? Yakisoba banh mi: a cold noodle sandwich. We bought one for science. Our verdict? “Eh.”

Days later, I heard word that Skillet Street Food was talking about frying pasta and serving it up in a sandwich. And then, I’m sitting at Taka Sushi the other night and after the baby octopus salad, aji with ponzu and fried bitter-melon slices, Taka-san passes this over the counter. “Hot dog,” he said, straight-faced:

“Oh I wish I were a spicy seafood wiener. . . that is what I truly like to be-eee-ee.”


The bun was lightly grilled, the noodles lightly warmed, the raw-fish garnish smacking of spicy mayo and — who knew? — maybe we’ve finally found our answer to the question, “What’s Seattle’s signature sandwich?”
Apparently, yakisoba pan (aka fried noodle sandwich) is the Japanese equivalent of a ballpark frank or a mini-mart hot dog, but somehow it’s never come across my radar — till now. Given the frequency with which this “strange snack” is making its appearance around here lately, could a spike in the trend be far behind?
I can see it already: gnocchi and guanciale on focaccia at Salumi! a linguine with fried clam sandwich at Ivar’s! “dork”-and-Barilla burgers at Lunchbox Laboratory! Could Nummy Noodle Sliders at Jack in the Box be next? What do you think?

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