403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
Follow us:
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx

All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

October 25, 2011 at 3:42 PM

Candy, squash, or candied squash? I’m sweet on delicata

“I hate squash. You couldn’t pay me to eat it.” So said my friend Melissa. “Five bucks says you’ll love this,” I replied, handing over one of the slices of delicata squash you see below. She ate it — and liked it.

What’s there not to like? You can even eat the skin. (In fact, it’s my favorite part.) As far as I’m concerned, delicata squash, simply roasted with olive oil is better than candy. Don’t believe me? Just try it yourself.

I’ll pass on the candy corn, but these delicata rounds? I can’t get enough of them.

I’m amazed how many people aren’t familiar with delicata, common though it may be, especially this time of year. “What is that?” I’ve been asked after bringing a platter to a potluck (note: they’re almost as good at room temperature as they are hot from the oven). What do you do with those?” a checker at my neighborhood grocer wondered when my squash rolled down her check-out lane a few weeks back. Here’s what I do:

A winter squash display at PCC. That’s the delicata on the bottom, right.

I buy two delicata (about 1 pound each). Torque my oven to 400 degrees. Scrub the squash clean with a vegetable brush. Slice off the ends, cut the squash into 1/2-inch rounds, and use a paring knife to remove the seeds.

This is a single-squash serving. Enough for two. Or for one, if that “one” is me.

Alternately, you could cut the squash lengthwise and use a sturdy spoon to scoop out the seeds, then make half-moon slices (that’s easier). Or cut it lengthwise and bake each half intact, like blogger Molly Watson did in this recipe.

Next, I spill some olive oil onto a rimmed baking sheet, flip the squash over so each slice gets oiled, season liberally with salt and pepper and roast until they’re brown and caramelized (40 minutes, more or less), turning once half-way through.

Before

After. Like onion rings, only sweeter. And better for you.

So, tell me pumpkin: What’s your favorite squash? And how do you like to prepare it?

Comments | More in Recipes | Topics: Produce/Farmers Markets

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx