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All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

January 20, 2012 at 12:41 PM

Game on! The newest food-lover’s treasure hunt

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Sharpen your brain now for prizes like Fran’s Chocolates. Photo by Courtney Blethen/Seattle Times

Going stir-crazy from the snow? Look ahead to a food-lover’s treat, a couple weeks of roaming town solving brain-teasers and hunting down restaurant prizes.

Sound familiar? It’s not another treasure hunt from the clever Canlis brothers, who cooked up a lot of fun last year with their hidden-menu scavenger search. This version is headed by Savor Seattle, which runs several culinary tours around town. The grand prize is a meal for two at every Tom Douglas restaurant, valued around $1,000. Daily gift-card prizes from tour stops like Fran’s Chocolates, Eltana bagels, and Yellow Leaf Cupcakes will range from $25 to $200, tied to the difficulty of the day’s puzzle.

Want to play? Here’s how:

Starting Feb. 1, a puzzle (think crosswords, logic games, riddles, brain-teasers) will go out on the company’s Facebook page or Twitter feed every day except Sundays throughout the month.

The first person or team to solve the day’s puzzle will win the gift-card prize of the day, and will be entered in a drawing for the grand prize. There will be other chances to win an entry to the grand prize drawing too, said company founder Angela Shen, opportunities like taking the best picture during the hunt.

Shen said she and her employees were “obsessive” hunters on the Canlis game, and that it taught them a lot even though they didn’t win. “We came close several times. The bitterness of our defeat really motivated us to keep going.” And, the sad feeling of walking away empty-handed inspired her to add a little “consolation prize” to her hunt; everyone who correctly solves the puzzle and shows up at the physical site it leads to will get a smaller treat, something along the lines of a free hot chocolate.

Why start up such an extensive puzzler game? Well, of course there’s marketing, the lure of maybe being the talk of the town, the hope that people will see the company as a place for locals and not just tourists. But Shen hopes it will be something to plain enjoy, to spark up the winter like last year’s “uber-awesome” city-wide game, “a little incentive to get out and do something fun.”

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