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All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

October 30, 2012 at 6:00 AM

Juiced up business expansion for local chefs

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Fresh juices are big business — even Starbucks is in the evolving market now — but smaller juice bars are the spot to find some serious talents these days. In Seattle, there are two culinarians behind the Nutrifaster N450 at “JuiceBox,” and they’re making a more permanent move for what started as a farmers market stand.

Kari Brunson and Brandin Myett, two Ethan Stowell alums, founded the business at the Broadway Farmers Market this past season, and they’re about to start a long-term pop-up inside La Bete restaurant on Capitol Hill. Starting Nov. 8, they’ll be pressing juices inside the spot at 1802 Bellevue Ave. from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. during weekend brunch.

Look for fresh raw juices like the ABCG (apple, beet, carrot, ginger) and tropical green (kale, pineapple, blood orange), for blended beverages like the chocolate mint (banana, coconut milk, cacoa nib, and mint), for juice elixirs like “steamed asian pear lemon ginger”, and “extras” like kale shots and lemon cayenne water. Myett and Brunson say that they use 2 to 2.5 pounds of produce in each 16 ounce juice, using “largely” organic and Washington fruits and vegetables.

Myett was a sous chef at La Bete after stints at Matt’s in the Market and How to Cook a Wolf. Brunson, a private chef, first caught my eye when she was a ballerina at Pacific Northwest Ballet with a food blog on the side (check out her account of a summer in professional kitchens here). She left the ballet world to train in her second career, working at Stowell’s restaurants, at Delancey, and at Mistral Kitchen, where owner William Belickis once told me she’d be one of the best chefs in Seattle in time. She and Myett, who met at Anchovies and Olives, used to frequent the Healeo juice bar near the restaurant, and started making juices daily at home “to save money and time” when they moved in together, they wrote back when founding the farmers market business that they funded through a Kickstarter campaign.

Their reception at the Broadway farmers market was “awesome” enough to warrant renting the La Bete space, Brunson said in an email Monday. If there’s enough juice in the idea, they hope to have their own permanent storefront by next summer.

Photo of Myett courtesy of Juice Box

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