Follow us:

All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

May 24, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Seattle’s ‘pot pigs’ go high on hog

Photo courtesy of BB Ranch

Photo courtesy of BB Ranch

Never mind the potbelly pigs. How about pot in the pigs? That’s what Seattle butcher shop BB Ranch is experimenting with, in a “high on the hog” story from Seattle Metropolitan on pigs raised on weed-laced feed.

Owner William von Schneidau (formerly of Bill the Butcher) told reporter Cassandra Sawyer that the animals from Snohomish’s Bucking Boar Farm ate feed spiked with cast-off, now-legal, marijuana roots, stems, and leaves from a medical marijuana facility. The heady experiment was meant as a “co-operative act of sustainable farming,” according to a video advertising a March “Pot Pig” dinner where the pigs were reputedly eaten. The point was to add fiber and flavor to the animals; the four pigs invoved, apparently, gained more weight than the norm (and were mellower too?)

The story has gone viral worldwide, with NPR calling the stoner swine mostly a publicity stunt, but also noting that “creative reuse of a local waste product is part of a larger trend of small farmers looking for new, free sources of livestock feed, especially since prices for corn and soy have been on the rise.” A Modern Farmer article said the “of-the-minute novelty” is “simply the latest iteration of (von Schneidau’s) longtime passion — drawing connections between an animal’s diet and its meat…Pot is the most recent of his off-template pig food, which has included spent vodka stillage, microbrew grains, and cantaloupes.”

Bucking Boar’s Facebook page notes that “In light of recent events…
Plans are in the works to grow more of the sought after hogs!” Until then, those curious about other edible implications of Washington voters legalizing marijuana can check out our 2012 article on the complications that still exist for actual “medibles,” or read the latest issue of Edible Seattle, which features recipes using “this centuries old culinary herb, some of which are intended to provide the user with noticeable effects, while others simply make use of cannabis in the same manner we might use thyme or marjoram.” There are recipes there for brownies, but not, at this point, for bacon.

0 Comments

COMMENTS

READER NOTE: Our commenting system has changed. Find out more.

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►