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June 6, 2014 at 11:55 AM

The Demise of Dot’s

Just days ago I lunched on superb grilled sausages and a perfect porchetta sandwich at Dot’s Charcuterie & Bistrot (né Dot’s Delicatessen) in Fremont —little knowing it would be my last chance to do so. Just hours ago, chef Miles James and his business partner Robin Short announced on Facebook that Dot’s will serve its last dinner tonight. No word on why.

Dot's Charcuterie & Bistrot in Fremont is closing tonight.

Dot’s Charcuterie & Bistrot in Fremont announced it is closing tonight.

The closing is abrupt to say the least. At lunch I overheard dining room manager Anna Wallace talking excitedly to customers about Dot’s new Happy Hour and their first prix fixe Sunday Supper this weekend, as she delivered their drinks: house-made vin maison, and a tall, brisk celery cordial made with sparkling wine, limonata and her own celery soda.

Celery Cordial/Photo by Nancy Leson

Dot’s Celery Cordial and vin maison /Photo by Nancy Leson

Dot’s opened in 2011 as a deli and sandwich spot, setting high standards for its sausages and charcuterie from the start. The small storefront gradually expanded its scope and hours. Closing briefly this spring for a revamp, it reopened as Dot’s Charcuterie & Bistrot, with a small service bar and an ambitious dinner menu, though still selling sausages and charcuterie from a small deli case up front. I won’t get to tonight’s last supper, but I will have my own private memorial later this weekend when we cook these beauties–purchased at Dot’s– on the Weber at home.

Polish and spicy Italian sausages from Dot's. Photo by Providence Cicero

Polish and spicy Italian sausages from Dot’s. Photo by Providence Cicero

 

Comments | More in Food and Restaurant News, Restaurants | Topics: Anna Wallace, Dot's Charcuterie & BIstrot, Miles James

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