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July 15, 2014 at 2:59 PM

13 Coins restaurant gets hip (yes, hip) Bellevue location

13 Coins file photo by Jim Bates/The Seattle Times

13 Coins file photo by Jim Bates/The Seattle Times

The 13 Coins restaurant has been called a lot of things over its decades in the Seattle area: Old-school. Venerable. Classic.

Then, there’s the newest branch in the works: “Hip.”

Huh?

The 8,000-square-foot 13 Coins branch planned to open in Bellevue late this year will be designed by Graham Baba Architects, the company that “has the blueprint for hot new restaurants.” You’ve seen their work at Revel, Walrus and the Carpenter, Skillet Diner, Westward, Miller’s Guild and plenty of other stylish places earning national acclaim.

Operations and food will be led by Bradley Dickinson and Mikel Rogers of Pearl, the “classy hot spot” in Bellevue’s Lincoln Square, who will be “operational partners and consultant” here.

The Bellevue branch will be open 24 hours, like the outlet in Seattle and its 38-year-old sister in SeaTac.

And, perhaps Bellevue itself is a draw now — “an increasingly active and vibrant place,” Coins co-owner Albert Moscatel said in a press release. (Big-time project 99 Park is opening in downtown Bellevue soon, with the owners noting that it’s a city that’s becoming more youthful and international.)

The new 13 Coins, adjacent to the Hyatt Regency, will “derive inspiration from traditional 13 Coins design elements, including tufted leather seating, high-back chairs and dark woods,” according to a release. Graham Baba, doing its first Eastside project, plans to “push the envelope a bit” with a contemporary interpretation. There will be a bar, outdoor seating, and a private dining area.

The company is also planning a 9,500-square-foot new Seattle branch in the massive Stadium Place project in SoDo, but that’s not expected to open until 2016.

The original 13 Coins opened in the 1960s, when, a Seattle Times reporter wrote, “it was the lone spot where patrons could order a New York strip steak or escargot at 3 in the morning — unless one preferred Bob Murray’s Dog House, where the rib-eye steak carried the warning: “Tenderness Not Guaranteed.”

“As the only late-night, gourmet option, it became anyone’s guess who would swivel around and reveal themselves from their high-back stools.”

It was started by the late restaurateur Jim Ward, Times reports said, who also founded the original El Gaucho in 1953 — the swanky steakhouse that, now, is also found in Bellevue.

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