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All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

Category: Cookbooks
February 12, 2015 at 3:15 PM

News you can eat: Crab gets pricier, a gluten-free brewery opens and more

CRAB PRICES in the Seattle area went up as much as 60 percent recently. Why is this happening right when local crab is at its greatest? WHY?! Tom Stocks at Taylor Shellfish says it’s love’s fault — well, love and some other things: “It’s a confluence of factors. Rough winter weather means less crab, and Chinese…

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Comments | Topics: $15, Counterbalance Brewing, crab

January 8, 2015 at 3:45 PM

News you can eat: Paseo’s back(!), Nue opens, Ms. Helen returns, Moon Temple to close and more

BRAND-NEW RESTAURANTS PASEO in Fremont: Yes, it’s true — the world’s best sandwich is back, as of today! I talked to the new owner… MORE>>> NUE on Capitol Hill: Owner Chris Cvetkovich worked in video games for 15 years, but he never owned an Xbox — he spent his free time cooking and traveling. Nue…

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Comments | Topics: Chavez, Coastline, Moon Temple

November 19, 2014 at 6:15 AM

Make some ‘shrooms: Cooking with delectable fungi

The simple button mushroom isn’t alone anymore in the grocery store. Well-stocked markets are offering chanterelles, shiitakes, porcinis, even vibrant red lobster mushrooms or pricey perfumed matsutakes. The mushrooming supply is a potential bonanza for home cooks. But, as personal chef and cooking instructor Becky Selengut found in her Seattle cooking classes, it’s also confounding. “People…

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Comments | Topics: Becky Selengut, Christina Choi, Jeremy Faber

November 12, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Seattle writer chronicles top picks for Northwest seafood

When it comes to seafood, sometimes we don’t recognize how good we have it in the Pacific Northwest. We get a timely reminder from Karen Gaudette Brewer in her new book, “Seafood Lover’s Pacific Northwest” (Globe Pequot, $19.95,) an exploration of those “edible treasures” — our waterways, our traditions, and how and where to…

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Comments | Topics: Chinook's, Duke's, Elliott's Oyster House

October 15, 2014 at 10:28 AM

How to make Skillet’s famous kale Caesar and poutine at home

You can make these Skillet classics, kale salad and poutine, at home. Photo by Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times

You can make these Skillet classics, kale salad and poutine, at home. Photo by Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times

Our happy hour last week was Skillet in all of its gluttonous bacon- jam-burger-and-poutine-glory. Have you been? If not, here’s your chance to sample  Skillet’s greatest hits – bacon jam burger, poutine, kale Caesar and fried chicken – in one sitting. All their classics are now offered in smaller portions during happy hour.

Or maybe you’re not the barhopping type. Well, we have some Skillet recipes to try at home – its kale Caesar, arguably Seattle’s most famous kale dish and its spin on the poutine. Enjoy.

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Comments | More in Cookbooks, Cooking, happy hour, Recipes | Topics: kale, Skillet, Tan Vinh

September 3, 2014 at 10:32 AM

Book reveals everything you didn’t know about apples

Have you ever wondered: that apple a day, the apple of our eye, the one that doesn’t fall far from the tree … just what kind of apple is it? In Rowan Jacobsen’s new book, “Apples of Uncommon Character” (Bloomsbury, $35), we see their stunning variety, with Jacobsen spotlighting more than 100 types of…

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Comments | More in Cookbooks | Topics: apples, Apples of Uncommon Character, cookbooks

December 12, 2013 at 6:00 AM

Whey ahead: The history of Pacific Northwest cheese

It feels sometimes like the revolution of fine artisan cheeses in the Northwest began about a decade ago. That’s when Kurt Dammeier founded Beecher’s Handmade Cheese in Pike Place Market, bringing a high profile to not just his own products but to a cheese counter that was whey, whey full of other Northwest finds….

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Comments | Topics: artisan cheese, Beecher's Cheese, Pacific Northwest Cheese: A History

November 21, 2013 at 4:12 PM

Chefs Matt Dillon and Blaine Wetzel celebrate Noma’s Rene Redzepi in Seattle

 

Revelers under the tent in Occidental Square. Photo: Nancy Leson

Revelers under the tent in Occidental Square. Photo: Nancy Leson

Matt Dillon/Photo by Ken Lambert

Matt Dillon/Photo by Ken Lambert

Dinner under a tent in Seattle in November? Call it foolhardy, even crazy, but also call it sold out—at $200 per person no less. Four hours after Lara Hamilton sent an email in mid-October to her Book Larder mailing list announcing the November 18th event, not a ticket was left. The draw was a chef trifecta. James Beard Award-winner Matt Dillon was cooking with Blaine Wetzel of Willow’s Inn, dubbed “one of ten restaurants in the world worth a plane ride” by the NY Times.

The guest of honor was Copenhagen chef Rene Redzepi of Noma, which held the number one spot on the list of “The World’s 50 Best Restaurants” three years running beginning in 2010. That’s the year “we went from zeros to heros,” said Redzepi in Seattle, one stop on his U.S. tour promoting his latest book, A Work in Progress. (If you missed him last night making chocolate-covered chicharones with Jimmy Kimmel and actor Idris Elba, watch it here. It’s hilarious!) Addressing the 160 people who braved Seattle’s rain and chill on Monday night an impressed Redzepi said, “This would never happen in Denmark.”

Rene Redzepi (center) signing books in Seattle/Photo: Nancy Leson

Rene Redzepi (second from left) signing books in Seattle/Photo: Nancy Leson

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Comments | Topics: A Work in Progress, Bar Sajor, Blaine Wetzel

October 3, 2013 at 6:00 AM

How to make those classic Pok Pok wings at home

Photo courtesy of Austin Bush

Photo courtesy of Austin Bush

 Those Pok Pok wings are be the biggest Asian comfort food to hit restaurants since David Chang’s pork belly buns. You can check out my cover story here. Everyone  seems to do them now. But no one does  them  quite like Pok Pok. They ‘re garlicky dark meat with a crispy skin, coated in a salty-and-sweet glaze, an umami bomb that will have you gnawing again and again. And now you can make them at home. 

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Comments | More in Chefs, Cookbooks, Recipes | Topics: Andy Ricker, Pok Pok wings, Tan Vinh

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