Follow us:

All You Can Eat

Trend-setting restaurants, Northwest cookbooks, local food news and the people who make them happen.

Topic: Mashiko

You are viewing the most recent posts on this topic.

November 12, 2013 at 1:06 PM

Seattle restaurateurs get real with Nancy Leson at Town Hall: Come on down!

What’s hot? Oh, let’s not! Instead, join Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson Thursday, Nov. 14 at Town Hall when the Seattle Times, in partnership with the Seattle Public Library, hosts a panel of chefs and restaurateurs who’ve been around long enough to know that being great trumps being new. How do they keep it real?…

More

Comments | Topics: Cafe Juanita, Hajime Sato, Holly Smith

June 10, 2013 at 2:42 PM

Eat a fish, save the oceans

PPfinalcoverWorld Oceans Day, June 8, was a reminder to reflect on our relationship to wild fish and the dwindling numbers of many species. Can we stop plundering the oceans and still feed a world population rapidly approaching 9 billion?

In a new book, “The Perfect Protein: The Fish Lover’s Guide to Saving the Oceans and Feeding the World,” Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless and co-author Suzannah Evans tackle that big question, outlining the issues and presenting solutions. Sharpless will be in Seattle on Wednesday, June 12, at 7 p.m. at the Elliott Bay Book Company on Capitol Hill for a reading followed by a Q & A session.

 

The book also addresses the consumer’s dilemma: How can we find and choose responsibly caught seafood? It includes recipes from top chefs, among them Eric Ripert, of New York’s famed seafood restaurant Le Bernardin, and Hajime Sato, the owner of Mashiko, Seattle’s first sustainable sushi bar. Sato will also attend the Elliott Bay Book Company event.

 

In an interview on KIRO Radio’s “Let’s Eat” that aired June 8, Sato talked about his decision to carry only sustainable seafood at his West Seattle restaurant.

 

“I’d been teaching on different occasions and in class they began asking where fish come from. I had to study about it.  I found out some were not sustainable. When I started to look into it, I began to feel like a hypocrite.”

More

Comments | Topics: Andy Sharpless, Asian Restaurants, Hajime Sato