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February 27, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Silver Platters moving to SODO

Just months after Easy Street Records closed up shop in Lower Queen Anne, Silver Platters, Seattle’s largest retailer of compact discs and vinyl records, has announced that it is also leaving the neighborhood  — for a new location in SODO.

“Commercial real estate is starting to get on the upswing again,” explained Silver Platters owner Mike Batt (pictured here), who has operated the Queen Anne Store (one of three Silver Platters) since 2007. “(Owners) who are sitting on  a property with two floors on it are not looking after their investment.”

The neighboood’s redevelopment boom made it impossible for the store to get a lease longer than two years, said Batt. At the new location, he was able to negotiate a five-year lease, and at a significantly lower rate.

The move will take place June 10. Batt hopes to open the new store within “two or three days” after the move.

The address of the new Silver Platters in SODO is 2930 First Ave. S., across the street from Starbucks headquarters.

Though the new space is slightly smaller than the present one — down from 14,500 to 12,700 sq. ft. — Batt says the store will maintain its “warehouse feeling,’ with concrete floors and high ceilings, and will continue to stock all kinds of music, from rock and pop to classical and jazz, as well as books. Murals like the ones on the walls at Queen Anne will be painted inside and out.

Despite the severe downturn nationally in sales of physical (as opposed to digital) music, Silver Platters has managed to do a robust business, largely due to the sale of used product. Batt said 2012 was the best year for the store since 2006.

He emphasized that he was sorry to leave Queen Anne.

“If I had the same deal here, I would stay,” he said.

(Alan Berner)

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