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May 20, 2013 at 6:30 AM

‘Star Trek’ and Folklife: 10 things to do this week

1 'Star Trek Into Darkness'

Now playing at several theaters. For Soren Andersen’s 3½-star review of the movie and an interview with cast members, go to  www.seattletimes.com/movies.

All aboard the Enterprise:  The crew of the starship returns to hunt down a master terrorist  in one of the all-time best entries in the durable franchise. But how does it compare to “Wrath of Khan”?

2 Fleetwood Mac

8 p.m. Monday at the Tacoma Dome; $49.50- $149.50, www.ticketmaster.com.

Originally formed in 1967 as a hard-driving blues-rock band, by 1975 Fleetwood Mac had re-imagined itself as one of the classic pop-rock bands of the ’70s, selling more than 40 million copies of the 1977 album “Rumours,” recently reissued in a deluxe edition. The Fleetwood Mac Live 2013 tour features original members Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, plus Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, who joined in 1975. Reviews suggest that while individual voices may show some wear, the group still has the old fire.

3 Northwest Folklife Festival

Friday through May 27, Seattle Center; free, $10/day donation requested,  www.nwfolklife.org.

The 42nd edition of the largest free community arts festival in the nation features a broad array of ethnic, folk and traditional music and dance performances, participatory dancing, workshops, craft and food vendors.

4 Walter Mosley

Noon Monday at Seattle Mystery Bookshop; free, www.seattlemystery.com; 7 p.m. Monday, Northwest African American Museum, Seattle; free, www.naamnw.org.

The prolific and articulate author comes to town to talk about “Little Green,” his 12th Easy Rawlins mystery.

5 'The Language Archive'

Through June 9, Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse; $15-$29,  www.seattlepublictheater.org.

Seattle Public Theater stages award-winning playwright Julia Cho’s comic love story about a linguist who can’t find the words to express his emotions.

6 James Harris Gallery

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays through June 15, James Harris Gallery, Seattle, www.jamesharrisgallery.com.

Harris’ lively gallery has reopened in new digs just up the street from the Smith Tower. It’s a roomier space, in a busier location. On show now: Bing Wright’s “Broken Mirror/Evening Sky,” photographs that have an unusual stained-glass radiance. Wright achieves the effect by projecting outdoor shots onto a broken mirror, then photographing the mirror reflection and blowing it up to cathedral-worthy proportions.

7 Summer Solstice kickoff

7 p.m. Saturday, Nectar Lounge, Seattle; www.nectarlounge.com.

If you live in Seattle, “Summer Solstice” screams “Fremont.” That funky ‘hood hosts a bright solstice-related fair every year, rain or shine; this year’s is June 21-23. But the fair’s lineup is ready to be made public; you can hear it at this free party at Nectar Lounge, plus listen to DJs and live music and enjoy $4 pints.

8 SIFF, continued

Through June 9 at various locations, including SIFF Cinema at the Uptown, SIFF Film Center, Pacific Place, Egyptian, Harvard Exit, Renton Ikea Performing Arts Center (May 23-29), Kirkland Performance Center (May 30-June 9);  www.siff.net.

Now in its 39th year, Seattle International Film Festival will screen 447 films, including 49 world premieres, plenty of documentaries and a festival-closing screening of Sofia Coppola’s “The Bling Ring.”

9 zoe | juniper

18 half-hour slots available Thursday and Friday between noon and 9 p.m. Velocity Dance Center, Seattle; free, www.velocitydancecenter.org.

Zoe Scofield and Juniper Shuey’s “open performance research and process” involves audience members lying on the floor for 30 minutes while a performance goes on above them. The idea is to shift “the spectator’s perspective and physical relationship to the performer” and to “explore dimensions of the performance space that are typically static.”

10 'Modern Family'

9 p.m. Wednesday, ABC

The popular mockumentary ends its fourth season this week. Viewers continue to flock to it because, as Brian Lowry of Variety wrote, “it’s smart, nimble and best of all, funny, while actually making a point about the evolving nature of what constitutes ‘family.’ “

Comments | More in List, The week ahead | Topics: Folklife, Fremont, Seattle Public Theater

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