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July 29, 2013 at 6:30 AM

Hydros and heroes: 10 things to do this week

Ariana Neal, left, and Michael B. Jordan in  "Fruitvale Station."/The Weinstein Company

Ariana Neal, left, and Michael B. Jordan in “Fruitvale Station.”/The Weinstein Company

We’re feeling a little super here at ArtsPage HQ — as in “superhero.” We’re fond of the X-Men saga, in comic form and on screen (OK, “The Last Stand” was not much to write home about), so we’re doubly happy that “The Wolverine” is the Blockbuster That Saved Summer.” Snick! Also garnering raves at theaters is the timely “Fruitvale Station,” the true story of  Oscar Grant, fatally shot in the back by a Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer in Oakland, Calif.

1 "The Wolverine"

Wide release; rated PG-13. For Soren Anderson’s 3.5-star review, click here.

Claws and a paper screen. Seems like a bad idea./Twentieth Century Fox

Claws and a paper screen. Seems like a bad idea./Twentieth Century Fox

“Don’t give up on super­hero cinema just yet. “The Wolverine” is a keeper,” writes Soren Anderson, in his review for The Seattle Times.  “It’s Hugh Jackman, ripped and raging, who centers the picture and compels our interest in the personality and personal struggles of Logan, aka the Wolverine, the man with the slashing, retractable adamantium claws.” ‘Nuff said.

2 'Fruitvale Station'

Guild 45th, Seattle, rated R; Seattle Times movie critic Moira Macdonald’s 3.5-star review is here.

“Fruitvale Station” is a fact-based portrait of 22-year-old Oscar Grant’s last day — the day in 2009 that Grant, unarmed, was killed by a BART officer at an Oakland train station. Also of note: It’s writer-director Ryan Coogler’s first feature-length film; on Friday, MGM announced that Coogler is going to co-write a “Rocky” spinoff.

 

3 Seafair Weekend

Genesee Park and Playfield, Seattle; free admission Friday; $10-$40 Saturday-Sunday, www.seafair.com

Dave Villwock's Pico American Dream went airborne in 2003./Greg Gilbert, The Seattle Times

Dave Villwock’s Pico American Dream went airborne in 2003./Greg Gilbert, The Seattle Times

This is the big three-day wrapup of  Seafair at Genesee Park/Lake Washington, that’s a big ol’ bash with food,  kids activities (think inflatable things for climbing and jumping), beer gardens, the Boeing Air Show featuring the Patriots Jet Team, Flying Heritage Collection flyover, performance by the Army Band, exhibits of vintage hydroplanes — and of course, hydroplane racing.

4 Gigantour

4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Comcast Arena, Everett; $25-$45, comcastarenaeverett.com

Featuring bands hand-picked by Megadeath frontman Dave Mustaine, this heavy- metal blowout features Megadeath, whose new album “Super Colider” hit No. 6 on the Billboard 200 but plummeted quickly, plus Black Label Society, Device, HELLYEAH, Newsted and Death Division.

5 Bruce Barcott

7 p.m. Thursday, Seattle Central Library, www.spl.org

Bruce Barcott

Bruce Barcott

This local author discusses “The Measure of a Mountain: Beauty and Terror on Mount Rainier,” the Transportation Choices Coalition’s Books on the Bus spring/summer 2013 selection, with “Well Read” host Terry Tazioli.

6 Seattle Festival of Dance Improvisation

“Lightning Talks,” 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, free, Velocity Dance Center;

“Dance Innovators in Performance,” 8 p.m. Thursday, $12, Broadway Performance Hall

SFDI celebrates its 20th anniversary this week, with two public events as highlights. The first is “Lightning Talks,” in which veteran improv artists John Jasperse, Sara Shelton Mann, Louis Gervais and others give seven-minute talks on their art, followed by Q&A, on Wednesday; the other  is “Dance Innovators in Performance,” featuring “exciting artists who have been dancing everywhere but in the mainstream,” including Jasperse, Mann, Gervais, Seattle’s own Salt Horse and others.

7 Marrowstone Music Festival

Thursday-Sunday, WWU Performing Arts Center, 516 High St., Bellingham; $15-$21 www.tickets.wwu.edu

 

The 69th annual Marrowstone Music Festival, presented by the Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras, continues in Bellingham with opera at 7:30 p.m. Thursday (three short operas, including a world premiere, by Seattle composer Eric Banks);  chamber music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday (works by Duruflé and Borodin); and closes with orchestral works (Grieg, Smetana, Bizet and Berlioz) at 3 p.m. Aug. 4.

8 'Skid Road'

8:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Aug. 9-10; Unexpected Productions, 1428 Post Alley, Seattle; $15 www.unexpectedproductions.org

Unexpected Productions’ latest improv show pits modern-day problems against Seattle’s sometimes-shady founding citizens. “Loosely inspired by HBO’s ‘Deadwood,’  the plays of David Mamet, and the true history of Seattle, Skid Road is a fully improvised retelling of how criminals and drunkards schemed, connived, fought, and yet somehow still managed to create a city,” according to UE. Note: Not for minors.

9 'Acclimatized: Heaven and Earth 5'

Carkeek Park, Seattle; daily through Oct. 20, www.heavenandearthexhibition.org

Center on Contemporary Art (CoCA),  Seattle Parks & Recreation and the Carkeek Park Advisory Council have again turned Carkeek Park into a labyrinthine open-air art exhibit. This year’s roster of 14 artists includes a number of new names. Their mission: to come up with “eco-artworks” that can “withstand the intensity of scrutiny by an estimated 100,000 summer visitors to the park.” Expect sculptures, interactive sound installations and all manner of things on your “art hike” through the park.

10 Sliders and a Sonic

5-7 p.m. Thursday, Daniel’s Broiler at South Lake Union; www.schwartzbros.com/daniels-broiler

Nick Collison in the Sonics days./Jim Bates, The Seattle Times

Nick Collison in the Sonics days./Jim Bates, The Seattle Times

Daniel’s Broiler continues its “celebrity grilling” series with former KU star and current Oklahoma City Thunder player Nick Collison, who joins chef Ayhan Barlas on Thursday. You can order some salmon sliders or grilled oysters and mingle with Collison to talk about the beloved Sonics. A portion of the proceeds will benefit a charity of Collison’s choice. Next up: Jesse Jones, on Aug. 8.

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