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Boeing Blog

Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates covers top industry events to bring you the latest news, highlighting how it impacts Boeing and its competitors.

Topic: Charleston

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July 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM

Ahead of Farnborough, Boeing touts progress in 787 Dreamliner production

Ahead of the Air Show, Boeing sought to demonstrate that its widebody jet plant in Everett is firing on all cylinders.

Last Tuesday, Pat Shanahan, Boeing senior vice president in charge of airplane programs, gave photographer Mike Siegel and me a guided tour of the 787 assembly lines in Everett.

Shanahan described remarkable progress in Dreamliner production since the years of problems and delays when, he said, “We were really struggling to get out of the ditch.”

A Machinist screws fasteners onto the underside of a Dreamliner 787 wing at the 787 final assembly factory in Everett. Photo: Mike Siegel

A Machinist screws fasteners onto the underside of a Dreamliner 787 wing at the 787 final assembly factory in Everett. Photo: Mike Siegel

He also cited specific improvement this year in the work coming to Everett out of South Carolina.

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June 18, 2013 at 4:04 AM

Paris Air Show: Boeing launches 787-10, punts on where it will be assembled

the 787-10 in the livery of Air Lease Corp., the lessor headed by industry guru Steven Udvar-Hazy

the 787-10 in the livery of Air Lease Corp., the lessor headed by industry guru Steven Udvar-Hazy

At the Paris Air Show Tuesday, as expected, Boeing launched the final and largest member of its Dreamliner jet family, the 787-10.

The jet officially entered the market with a total of 102 orders from blue-ribbon customers United, British Airways, Singapore Airlines, GECAS (the airplane leasing unit of GE) and Air Lease Corp., the lessor run by longtime industry market-maker Steve Udvar-Hazy.

Udvar-Hazy ordered 30, as did Singapore. British ordered 12. GECAS ordered 10. United ordered 20, of which ten were conversions of previous orders for smaller versions of the 787. First delivery is scheduled for 2018.

In a briefing ahead of the launch, a top executive said Boeing hasn’t decided where the jet will be built.

Officials in Washington state are concerned that logistical issues around transporting the bigger plane sections to Everett and fitting the completed planes nose-to-tail on an assembly line could rule out the 787-10 for Everett, so that this largest Dreamliner would be assembled exclusively in South Carolina.

“When we’re ready to announce it, we’ll announce it,” said Scott Fancher, Boeing vice president of airplane development.

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Comments | More in Airbus, Boeing, Paris Air Show 2013 | Topics: 787-10, Charleston, Everett

June 16, 2013 at 4:30 PM

Paris Air Show: Putting on a brave face at Washington’s reception

The Cercle National des Armees, a military officers' club and hotel, the venue for Washington State's reception on the eve of the Paris Air Show

The Cercle National des Armees, a military officers’ club and hotel, the venue for Washington State’s reception on the eve of the Paris Air Show

At Washington state’s reception on the eve of the Paris Air Show, state officials acknowledged the possibility that Everett may lose out on assembling the 787-10, the latest and biggest model in the Dreamliner jet family, likely to be launched at the show on Monday.

Two officials at the reception, speaking on background, said they were not surprised at the idea that the biggest Dreamliner may be assembled exclusively at Boeing’s 787 plant in North Charleston, S.C.

Both observed that the new 787 final assembly plant in South Carolina is big enough to fit four of the large 787-10s nose-to-tail, which they don’t think is true in the two 787 assembly bays in Everett.

But all the delegates put on a brave face, asserting that Washington retains huge advantages in the industry with its almost 100-year legacy of aviation excellence.

They certainly didn’t criticize Boeing, instead insisting that the company spreading work around to other states only underlines how aggressively Washington needs to work to retain the jetmaker and all the jobs that go with it both at Boeing and its suppliers.

“Boeing is increasingly in a competitive global environment, not just with Airbus,” said Dow Constantine, King County executive. “They have to make some very tough decisions. Our job is to make sure that to the extent possible, our region builds on its advantages and removes any impediments to Boeing.”

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Comments | More in Boeing, Paris Air Show 2013 | Topics: 787-10, Charleston, South Carolina