Follow us:

Brier Dudley's blog

Brier Dudley offers a critical look at technology and business issues affecting the Northwest.

January 8, 2007 at 1:16 PM

One of the coolest CES gadgets, so far

LAS VEGAS — High on my list is an ultra-mobile PC out of left field: A dual-mode, dual-band WiMax portable information terminal running Windows XP from Samsung, which calls the device the “Mobile WiMax Deluxe MITs.”

It’s a white box about the size of an old Walkman cassette player. But you open it up and it has a color screen, fold-out keyboard and built-in 1.3 megapixel camera for making video calls over the Internet. It also comes with a companion WiMax flip phone in case you just want to talk.


BRIER DUDLEY

Two Samsung MITs; the one in back is closed, and plugged to a phone.

MITs is a term Samsung has used to describe “mobile information terminals,” which include both phone and data capabilities.

The new device connects to the Internet via WiMax, and it can “seamlessly” switch to CDMA cell networks when it gets out of WiMax range, according to Jim Parker, a senior wireless systems manager at Samsung Telecommunications America in Richardson, Texas.

Parker said the device will start selling around March for $2,000. Samsung is working with Sprint on a mobile WiMax service to be tested by the end of this year and be available in 2008.

Also on display were several Samsung WiMax phones and a nifty multi-mode WiMax router that also uses Wi-Fi to distribute signals around the house. All in a box about half the size of a DSL modem, or perhaps half the size of a Clearwire box.

Other Samsung goodies ranged from wafer thin media players to a 102-in.’ plasma TV. Its gee-whiz product was a double-sided LCD display that uses the same light source to display different images on each side of the 2.22-inch screen.

Also impressive was a demonstration of bleeding edge HSPA cell network technology that can upload music and photos from a cell phone at 2 megabits per second and download at 3 Mbps. That’s nine times faster than 3G networks.

Comments | More in | Topics: CES

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►