Follow us:

Brier Dudley's blog

Brier Dudley offers a critical look at technology and business issues affecting the Northwest.

August 15, 2007 at 11:42 AM

Technology Review calls out UW innovators

The UW had an impressive showing on Technology Review‘s annual list of the top innovators under age 35.

Three Huskies are on the list, including computer science doctoral student Tapan Parikh, who was named “top humanitarian of 2007” for his mobile phone technology helping small-business owners in developing countries. Here’s a March blog post describing his work.

Jason Pontin, editor of the MIT publication, said in a release that it’s “remarkable to have three recipients at one institution.”

The other two are Yoshi Kohno, assistant professor of computer science, for work that may improve the safety and privacy of online transactions, and Babak Parviz, an assistant professor of electrical engineering researching the intersection of biology and nanotechnology.

Here are their nutshell biographies, provided by the UW:

Kohno, 29, invented the concept of systems-oriented provable security, which promises to beef up the safety and privacy of online transactions. His other research has looked at the security and privacy implications of electronic voting machines, consumer electronics, Web browsers and radio frequency identification (RFID) electronic tags.

Parikh, 33, a doctoral student in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, uses mobile phones and open-source software to create novel tools for the developing world. He started a company in India to develop a product for microfinance co-ops and is now creating tools for health-care diagnoses and agricultural certification.

Parviz, 34, an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, is recognized for his research at the interface of biology and nanotechnology. Parviz works on biologically inspired self-assembly. He has used the method to build flexible plastic circuits, nano-scale electronics and low-cost biological sensors for detecting diseases such as HIV.

UPDATE: There were a few more on the list but not included in the original release:

Microsoft Research’s Desney Tan, an affiliate UW computer science professors, noted for using electroencephalography (EEG) signals to operate computers.

UW alum Karen Liu, a Georgia Tech professor applying body language to computer-animated characters.

Comments | More in | Topics: Education

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►