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February 24, 2010 at 10:38 AM

Nintendo reveals 2010 plans: Big DS March 28, new Mario and a mini Kindle

Nintendo announced its lineup for the first half of 2010 at a press event in San Francisco today, finally sharing release dates for new products revealed over the last year.

Topping the list is the DSi XL, a bigger version of the comany’s handheld, which goes on sale March 28 for $189.99 in burgundy or bronze. It will be preloaded with “BrainAge” games to help kids persuade parents that it’s educational.

With the XL, the DS is approaching the size of a small clutch purse, with 4.2-inch screens that are 93 percent bigger than the DS Lite and a stylus that’s about the size of a regular pen.

Closed, it’s 6.3 by 3.6 inches and weighs “approximately 11.08 ounces (314 grams),” according to Nintendo.

New games include updates of key Wii franchises: “Super Mario Galaxy 2” is launching May 23 for the Wii, with new tools for Mario, such as a drill for tunneling through rocks, “Metroid: Other M” appears June 27 with the ability for players to switch on the fly between a classic 2-D format and 3-D play.

The company is also attempting to get in on the electronic book craze by releasing a set of classic books in the DS format.

Nintendo optimistically said its “100 Classic Books” title “transforms the Nintendo DS family of products into a library of timeless literature.” The $19.99 game coming June 14 includes books from authors such as Shakespeare, Jules Verne, Jane Austen and Mark Twain. Text size can be adjusted on the device, bookmarks can be added and new content can be downloaded via Wi-Fi.

Here’s a Nintendo image of the DS lineup, with the XL on the right:

Nintendo DS family_open fans.JPG

Comments | Topics: dsi xl, Gadgets & products, Games & entertainment

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