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Brier Dudley offers a critical look at technology and business issues affecting the Northwest.

March 22, 2011 at 10:54 AM

Photos: Bigger, faster superphones in 4G, 3D and dual-core

Every time you turn around nowadays there’s another huge tech trade show, at which a bunch of new phones and tablets are announced.

Here’s a sample of the cool new gadgets surfacing at the CTIA wireless conference this week in Orlando. Some of the devices were already announced, and some still don’t have prices and specific ship dates yet.

Sprint was the first to offer a 4G phone in the U.S., and now it’s offering a 4G phones with glasses-free 3D displays, available 2U this summer for a price to be announced later. It’s an Android-based device built by HTC, with the “Sense” interface designed in Pioneer Square.

The HTC Evo 3D has a 4.3-inch, 960 by 540 pixel 3D display. Inside it has dual-core 1.2 gigahertz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, 4 gigabytes of internal memory and 1 gig of RAM. It functions as a 3G/4G hotspot supporting up to eight devices at once over WiFi and outputs 720p video via HDMI. On the back it has dual 5 megapixel cameras for taking 3D images and videos.

HTC-EVO-3D-angle.jpg

HTC-EVO-3D-back.jpg

Sprint’s also going to sell a tablet-sized version of the device, called the HTC Evo View 4G. It has a 7-inch diagonal, 1024 by 600 pixel touchscreen (without 3D). The tablet runs on a 1.5 GHz Snapdragon dual-core processor with 32 gigs of internal memor and 1 gig of RAM. It also uses HTC’s “Scribe” system for input with a digital pen and works as a hotspot.

HTC-EVO-View-4G-vert.jpg

Yesterday, Sprint announced that it’s also going to sell Google’s new flagship Android device, the Nexus S 4G. The Samsung phone has a 4-inch Super AMOLED screen, 1 GHz processor, a dedicated graphics processing unit and Android version 2.3 (“Gingerbread”). Sprint and Google also said they’re connecting Google Voice, so Sprint customers can use their phone number with Google’s calling service. The phone’s coming this spring.

Nexus-S-4G-angle.jpg

AT&T yesterday announced that it’s also selling a glasses-free 3D phone, the LG Thrill 4G, with a 4.3-inch screen, dual-core 1 GHz processor and Android version 2.2. The Thrill comes with 16 gigs of memory – 8 onboard plus an 8 gig memory card – and records 3D video at 720p and 2D video at 1080p. It also plays back high-def video thorugh an HDMI port or streams it to DLNA devices.

LG_Thrill_Right.jpg

AT&T’s also going to sell a version of the Windows-based HTC HD7, which it’s calling the HD7S. It’s going to use the HSPA+ network and have the updated software with cut-and-paste when it’s released in a few weeks.

T-Mobile also introduced several new phones, including the “G2x with Google by LG,” or the G2x for short. It’s based on a dual-core 1 GHz Tegra 2 processor and Android 2.2. There’s also an 8 megapixel camera that takes 1080p video and front-facing 1.3 megapixel chatcam.

T-Mobile announced that it’s boosting the maximum speed of its HSPA+ network in a handful of markets – Las Vegas, Orlando and New York – to 42 megabits per second. To get those speeds, you’ll need a new device, though – namely the “Rocket” stick modems announced at the show:

T-Mobile Rocket 3 0.jpg

The Bellevue-based company also introduced a “value” smartphone, the Nokia Astound, that will cost $80 (after a $50 rebate) when it goes on sale April 6. It has a 3.5-inch AMOLED touchscreen, free turn-by-turn navigation and an 8 megapixel camera that takes 720p video. The Astound is based on Nokia’s Symbian operating system that’s going to be displaced starting next year by Windows.

nokia-astound-combo.jpg

Comments | Topics: 4G, Adobe, Android

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