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Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

December 31, 2013 at 5:00 AM

Education Lab’s most popular stories: practical information for change

Education coverage often gets a bad rap: Too wonkish, too soft. Too superficial. Too boring.

We launched the Education Lab project in October 2013 to address that, running in-depth stories that feature both humanity and proven approaches to creating positive change in schools.  So far we’ve written about fast-track improvements at a long-struggling elementary school; counteracting the damage caused by student absences, and the transformative power of parent involvement.

Coming up in 2014: How to get high school dropouts back on track; reimagining Advanced Placement courses and creating a college-going culture.

From the start, Education Lab aimed to shift the tenor of debate swirling around education reform by presenting detailed, useable information about school-improvement efforts that have a demonstrated track record or show real promise. To that end, our most popular blog posts – on demystifying computer science, the much-discussed PISA exam and the value of apprenticeships – have also focused on practical ways to create change.

In just two months, our most popular posts and stories netted some 30,000 combined page views, and dozens of thoughtful comments. For us, one of the most heartening takeaways has been the quality of your response. Academics, politicians, parents and educators have weighed in with hope, enthusiasm and ideas.

So now we turn the question back to you. What else would you like to see Education Lab tackle in the coming year? We’re looking around the state and across across the nation for approaches that are relevant to the Puget Sound region, and we know you’ve got something to say about it.

Give us your best.

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