Follow us:

Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

July 18, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Think the least educated drink most? Data might surprise you

Numbers can anchor free-floating impressions, but sometimes they offer unexpected revelations.

To wit: Those with a master’s degree spend five times the amount that high-school dropouts spend on alcohol — $748 versus $148 each year.

On the other hand, dropouts spend more than double what the highly-educated spend on tobacco — $323 compared to $143.

Screen shot of the "Degrees of Spending" infographic

Screen shot of the “Degrees of Spending” infographic

These data come from number-crunchers hired by Retale, a mobile app that collects store circulars so customers can find the best deals in their area. In other words, Retale is not an education-advocacy group by any stretch.

But the company has used data from Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditure Survey to create “Degrees of Spending,” an interactive snapshot of the way education relates to lifestyle.

Housing: a dropout spends almost 40 percent of total income on shelter; someone with an advanced degree? Less than a third of annual income.

Healthcare: Those with a master’s degree spend about 3.6 percent of their income on health insurance, compared to 5.1 percent spent by those with no college education.

You get the picture.

Play around with the graphic by hovering your cursor over different areas. You can see spending comparisons for various education levels. Clicking on a box breaks that information into more detail. Who knew that academics were such fans of public transportation?

Comments | More in News | Topics: demographics, higher ed

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►