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Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

August 22, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Seattle ‘maker party’ promotes Internet literacy, carrots included

Anyone who’s ever wanted to get their feet wet making something for the web instead of just surfing it should join the “maker party” Friday evening at the Seattle Central Library.

The two-day party, which started Thursday, is free and open to anyone 12 and older who would like to tinker with programming languages such as Python, JavaScript and Ruby on Rails, work with volunteer mentors on a web project, or even build a robot.

Scene from a previous Mozilla Makers party. Photo courtesy Mozilla.

Scene from a previous Mozilla Makers party. Photo courtesy Mozilla.

It’s one of several hands-on opportunities in the Seattle area to become a producer of digital culture rather than just a consumer.

“Maker Party Pop-Up Seattle” is part of an annual 60-day cycle of volunteer-run events in hundreds of cities around the world.  They are all organized by Mozilla, maker of the Firefox browser, to promote web literacy.

One of the local party hosts is the Seattle branch of Geek Girls Carrots, an international organization that brings together communities of girls and women interested in computer technology and professionals already in the field.

Geek Girls Carrots Seattle has about 250 members locally and holds monthly meetings.

What do carrots have to do with it?

Well, hackathons tend to be fueled with junk food. Geek Girls wanted a healthier option, so they bring carrots to every event, says Sanda Htyte, one of the group’s co-organizers.

Stem Paths Innovation Network, which focuses on connecting youth with technology in low-income communities, will be offering a robotics class at the party. Seattle Public Libraries and the Pacific Science Center also are partners.

The Maker Party is from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Seattle Central Library, 1000 4th Ave. Participants should bring their own laptops.

Comments | More in Math and science, News | Topics: coding, Computer technology, STEM

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