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December 1, 2014 at 7:35 AM

UW academic redshirt program draws more women, minorities into engineering

Devin Pegues, left, and Casiano Atienza work on a math problem during a recent class at the UW. This math workshop uses whiteboards and group problem-solving to bring engineering-level math to first-year students. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Devin Pegues, left, and Casiano Atienza work on a math problem during a recent class at the UW. This math workshop uses whiteboards and group problem-solving to bring engineering-level math to first-year students. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

When she got the letter in summer 2013, Courtney Seto thought it sounded too good to be true.

A free program that offered automatic acceptance into the University of Washington’s engineering school? Did everyone get this letter?

Seto had already been accepted to the UW as an incoming freshman, but she expected to apply to the College of Engineering at the end of her sophomore year, competing against a thousand other UW students, of which only about 55 percent get in.

So Seto set the letter aside — until somebody at the UW called and convinced her it was for real.

Now in her sophomore year, Seto has already been accepted into the industrial engineering department, thanks to the UW’s State Academic Red Shirt program, or STARS.

In an idea borrowed from college athletics called redshirting, STARS enrolls promising engineering students — many of them women and minorities — to give them an additional year of collegiate academic work before they’re ready for the big time. A similar program is in its second year at Washington State University.

Go here for the full story.

Comments | More in News | Topics: diversity, STEM, University of Washington

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