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Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

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You are currently viewing all posts written by Katherine Long.

October 22, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Record-high enrollment at WSU and UW’s three campuses

The WSU campus in Pullman. Photo by Alan Berner / The Seattle Times 2011.

The WSU campus in Pullman. Photo by Alan Berner / The Seattle Times 2011.

Both the University of Washington and Washington State University are reporting record-high enrollments for this academic year, with UW enrollment up 3 percent from the previous year and WSU up 4 percent.

All told, the UW’s three campuses — Seattle, Bothell and Tacoma — now enroll 54,223 students. That’s almost as many people as live in Redmond.

The Seattle campus alone added more than 1,000 students, bringing its total to 44,786. In its most recent count, The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked the UW 12th-largest among public universities that offer doctoral degrees, and that was based on 2012 figures when total enrollment at the Seattle campus was 43,485.

The UW had both the highest undergraduate student enrollment in its history (41,243 students) and also the highest graduate student enrollment (12,980 students) when all three campuses are added together.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: higher education, University of Washington, Washington State University

October 20, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Free Seattle college fair features 325 schools

Mark your calendars: The Seattle National College Fair, a free event that brings 325 colleges and universities to Seattle for a weekend, will be held Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 this year at the Washington State Convention and Trade Center.

The event gives students and their families the chance to gather up reams of brochures and leaflets about the colleges, ask questions of admissions representatives and learn about financial aid offerings. Participants include two- and four-year colleges and universities, both public and private, including many from outside the United States.

The event is always highly recommended for high-school juniors, as well as seniors, because it can help younger students get a handle on what the admission process is all about.

The fair runs from 9 a.m. to noon on Oct. 31, and from noon to 4 p.m. on Nov. 1.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: college, college fair, higher education

October 14, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Schooling 5th graders on college: CWU adopts Western’s program

Nearly 300 fifth-graders from the Wapato School District will visit Central Washington University later this month, a new mentoring program modeled after one created at Western Washington University that was featured in Education Lab last year.

Like Western’s program, called Compass 2 Campus, the CWU program recruits college-age mentors who will volunteer in Wapato classrooms four hours a week, and encourage young children to finish high school and enroll in college.

Fifth-grade students examine seaweed from a sea-life exhibit while participating in Western Washington University's Compass 2 Campus program. Photo by Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times 2013

Fifth-grade students examine seaweed from a sea-life exhibit while participating in Western Washington University’s Compass 2 Campus program. Photo by Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times 2013

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Comments | More in News | Topics: Central Washington University, higher education, mentors

October 9, 2014 at 5:12 PM

UW President Michael Young gets 6.2 percent raise

The University of Washington’s Board of Regents gave President Michael K. Young a raise of 6.22 percent on Thursday, or another $50,004 a year. That brings his salary to $853,508, including a salary of $622,008, deferred compensation of $193,500, a $12,000 per year car allowance and a retirement plan contribution of $26,000. Young also received a 4 percent…

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Comments | More in News | Topics: higher education, University of Washington

October 7, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Common Core tests now a ticket out of college remedial classes

A new agreement among the state’s public colleges will raise the value of a couple of Washington’s high-school exams.

The new math and reading exams, which are called Smarter Balanced and will be given to all Washington 11th-graders this spring, will factor not just into whether students graduate, but whether they need to take remedial classes in college.

The new tests are designed to measure whether 11th graders are on track to meeting the new Common Core state standards  a set of learning goals that most states are starting to use. Students who score at the top two levels will be placed directly into college-level math and English when they enter any Washington public two- or four-year college.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: common core, higher ed, Smarter Balanced

September 29, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Tacoma university offers more financial help to local students

A generation ago, the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma was the kind of liberal-arts college that attracted mostly local, home-grown students. But as it built a national reputation  and as the price of tuition rose  the school’s enrollment increasingly came from out of state. Today, 80 percent of UPS students come from outside Washington.

Now, UPS is looking to change that.

The university is making a new push into Tacoma public schools, whose students account for only about 2 percent of the university’s enrollment. UPS is promising that if they are admitted, the university will meet their financial need through a combination of scholarships, grants, loans and work study.

UPS President Ron Thomas said the community has the perception that the college is difficult to get into, and too expensive. He said UPS has always tried to meet the financial need of students who couldn’t afford full tuition, so the campaign is in part an effort to make people more aware of financial aid resources.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: higher ed, private colleges, Tacoma

September 19, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Sticker relief: First thoughts of a new public college parent

“Here’s the bill for Western,” I told my husband this summer, waving a piece of paper in the air. “Tuition and fees are going to be $8,965.”

“Per quarter?” he asked.

“No! We’re in the state school system now. That’s for a whole year.”

I’ve been covering higher education in Washington since 2011, and I’ve also experienced college as a parent through the filter of my daughter, who’s been at an out-of-state private college for the past three years. But this fall, my son becomes a freshman at Western Washington University, and for the first time I’m the parent of a student in the system I’ve been writing about.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: higher ed, Western Washington University

September 12, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Brigham Young tops list of WA’s out-of-state college choices

Recently, we wrote about the large number of Washington state students who go out of state for a college education. Of all the western states, Washington loses the most college-bound students, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, a federally-run data clearinghouse.

Where do they all go? Believe it or not, the two most popular out-of-state schools for the 2012-13 school year were Brigham Young University-Idaho and Brigham Young University in Utah. Those two schools account for nearly 9 percent of the 7,409 Washington students who graduated in spring 2012 and went immediately to out-of-state colleges in the fall.

State universities in Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Arizona were also big draws. Popular California schools included the public California Polytechnic State University (or Cal-Poly, as it’s known), and three privates: Santa Clara University, the University of Southern California and Chapman University.

But what’s also striking is that the top 25 schools only account for 40 percent of the students who leave the state. That suggests to us that Washington students choose many, many different schools across the nation when they decide to leave home.

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Comments | Topics: college, out-of-state

September 9, 2014 at 9:48 AM

U.S. News: UW ranks 14th among public national universities

Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times 2008.

Aerial view of the UW campus in Seattle. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times 2008.

The University of Washington went up a few places in the U.S. News & World Report’s list of the best colleges and universities in the country, reaching 48th place among all national universities. Among public national universities, it ranked 14th.

Last year, the UW was ranked 52nd among national universities.

Washington State University, which was ranked 128th last year, fell 10 places, to 138th.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: college rankings, higher ed, UW

September 8, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Excellent Sheep? Author says higher education system is broken

A new book questioning whether an education at one of the country’s elite colleges prepares students to find true meaning in their lives is getting a lot of buzz in education circles this fall.

“Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life,” by William Deresiewicz, argues that the nation’s elite colleges don’t promote intellectual curiosity, and leave students without a sense of purpose, unwilling to take a chance on pursuing their passions and largely all pursuing the same high-paying but soul-sucking jobs  in finance, or as a consultant.

A Hungarian shepherd drives a herd of sheep near Hortobagy, a village 183 kilometers east of Budapest. Photo by Zsolt Czegledi/European Press Association.

A shepherd drives a herd of sheep near Hortobagy, Hungary. Photo by Zsolt Czegledi/European Press Association.

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Comments | More in News | Topics: college, excellent sheep, higher ed

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