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Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

Category: Your voices
February 18, 2015 at 3:01 PM

Why I Teach: Join us for an inspiring evening of storytelling

Ryan Reilly, a third-grade teacher at White Center Heights Elementary in Seattle, leads students through a reading exercise in 2013. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Ryan Reilly, a third-grade teacher at White Center Heights Elementary in Seattle, leads students through a reading exercise in 2013. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Why teach? Educators today are under more pressure than ever before. Standards are changing, schools are growing, and the pay isn’t getting any better. Even so, talented and passionate individuals are still pursuing the profession, and veteran educators continue their work despite all the challenges.

Next Wednesday, Feb. 25, The Seattle Times – Education Lab, in partnership with the University of Washington College of Education and 88.5 KPLU, will present a teacher storytelling event on the University of  Washington campus in Seattle.

The evening begins with an informal welcome reception with light refreshments from 6:30 to 7 p.m. outside Kane Hall room 220. Storytelling starts inside the auditorium at 7 p.m.

The program will be the third storytelling event organized by Education Lab. The first two events focused on students who had overcome obstacles to get to college. This time, five local teachers will share short personal stories about what led them to education, and what’s kept them going.

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Comments | More in News, Your voices | Topics: Lyon Terry, storytellers, Why I Teach

February 8, 2015 at 5:00 PM

Tell us: Who should be the next UW president?

Michael Young. Photo by Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times.

Michael Young. Photo by Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times.

Last week’s announcement from University of Washington president Michael Young caught just about everyone by surprise. Young, who will take the top job at Texas A&M this spring, had only been at the helm at UW since 2011.

Several commenters on seattletimes.com criticized his early departure and urged the university to select a new president who has local ties and is more likely to stick around.

“When are they going to hire someone who wants to be the president of the UW? Leading the UW should be the pinnacle of a career not a stepping stone to something else,” wrote one.

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Comments | More in Your voices | Topics: higher ed, Michael Young, University of Washington

February 2, 2015 at 1:04 PM

Teachers: Share your story on stage at our next event

Grace Friedman, a teacher at White Center Heights Elementary School, interacts with students Jose Almeralla Rodriguez, left, and An Lam. Photo by  Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times 2013.

Grace Friedman, a teacher at White Center Heights Elementary School, interacts with students Jose Almeralla Rodriguez, left, and An Lam. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times 2013.

Why teach? Educators today are under more pressure than ever before. Standards are changing, schools are growing, and the pay isn’t getting any better. Even so, talented and passionate individuals are still pursuing the profession, and veteran educators continue their work despite all the challenges.

The Seattle Times – Education Lab, in partnership with the University of Washington College of Education and 88.5 KPLU, will present a teacher storytelling event on Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. on the UW campus.

The program will be the third storytelling event organized by Education Lab. The first two events focused on students who had overcome obstacles to get to college.

This time around, we’re looking for a handful of teachers who are willing to share five-minute personal stories about teaching on stage.

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Comments | More in News, Your voices | Topics: storytellers, why teach

January 24, 2015 at 6:10 PM

Submit a question for video chat on restorative justice

Monae Trevino, second from left, is embraced by a fellow student during a discussion at Big Picture High School in Burien. Photo by Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times.

Monae Trevino, second from left, is embraced by a fellow student during a discussion at Big Picture High School in Burien. Photo by Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times.

Monae Trevino, a student at Big Picture High School in Burien, has had her fair share of interactions with school authority.

Trevino, 18, has been suspended on more than one occasion at other, more traditional schools. But at Big Picture, where teachers and administrators practice an alternative form of discipline called restorative justice, she has had to meet with peers and educators to talk through her actions and learn how they impact others.

Oftentimes, she says, restorative justice is tougher to handle than suspension.

“You can’t run from anything, and to have people talking good about you, telling you they’re truly disappointed — it hurts. It was kind of overwhelming, actually,” she told reporter Claudia Rowe, who wrote an extensive story about restorative justice for Sunday’s paper.

On Tuesday, Rowe and Trevino will meet in The Seattle Times’ video studio to talk about restorative justice, why it works, and about reader reaction to the Sunday story. Their conversation will be video recorded and posted on the Education Lab blog later in the week.

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January 24, 2015 at 6:01 PM

Your voices: Parents, teachers share ideas for fixing discipline

As part of our ongoing series on school discipline, Education Lab recently asked readers to share their experiences with student discipline. A selection of these responses are below (some have been edited for length or clarity).

Want to add your own two cents? Go here to share your thoughts. We may publish another round of responses at a later date.

How have you seen discipline handled well?

Discipline has worked when I’ve seen adults willing to be a mediator for helping students listen to each other. Establishing agreements (not rules) beforehand and continuing to revisit them is also helpful. When children know they can trust, they will be heard, they are more willing to listen and learn and be guided.

–Marcia Christen, Poulsbo

I see more schools using positive behavioral supports. We have to teach kids how to behave and the right social skills to get their needs met. Suspending them only makes it worse.

–Lori Lynass (teacher), Shoreline

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Comments | More in Your voices | Topics: discipline

January 22, 2015 at 11:53 AM

Tell us: How have you seen student discipline handled well?

Boo Davis / The Seattle Times

Boo Davis / The Seattle Times

Education Lab’s series on student discipline continues Sunday with a story about how a Burien school is using an approach called restorative justice to reduce suspensions and develop a stronger sense of personal responsibility among students.

The story will be Part II in our series, which began last month with a look at how the Kent School District is working toward similar outcomes and testing out in-school suspensions as an alternative to more traditional forms of discipline.

Along the way, we’ve been asking readers to share their experiences with school discipline. Where have you seen it done well? What can teachers or administrators do to better balance the need to minimize classroom disruptions with the desire to reduce suspensions and expulsions?

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Comments | More in Question of the Week, Your voices | Topics: discipline

December 12, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Tell us: What should top Nyland’s to-do list for Seattle schools?

Larry Nyland

Larry Nyland

If there’s one thing Larry Nyland has, it’s experience.

The new leader of Seattle Public Schools, offered the permanent job on Wednesday, started his first superintendency in 1982, in Pasco. He’s also held administrative positions in Alaska, Shoreline and Highline, before becoming Marysville superintendent in 2004.

Seattle School Board member Sharon Peaslee said Nyland’s ability to lead districts through tough times is one of the key reasons she recommended the board extend his contract through June 2017. The motion was approved with a 5-2 vote on Wednesday.

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Comments | More in News, Your voices | Topics: Larry Nyland, Seattle Public Schools, your voices

December 6, 2014 at 10:00 PM

Your voices: Teachers share thoughts, best practices on student discipline

Education Lab recently reached out to a handful of teacher groups in an effort to gather educators’ thoughts and experiences with student discipline, as part of our Sunday story about the issue. What follows in a sampling of the responses we’ve received so far.

Are you a teacher, parent or student? Have something to say about this important topic? Join the discussion by filling out our reader questionnaire or weighing in in the comments section.

How do you approach student behavior in your classroom? Has your strategy or technique changed at all during your career? If so, how?

I try to deal with children one on one. If that fails, then I call home. If the behavior continues, then I use the progressive discipline (guidelines) in our school.

At Kentlake (High School), we have been doing a freshman retreat for all ninth-grade kids. We also have been doing a Breaking Down the Walls community building exercise for the past four years. As a result, the number of fights at Kentlake are the lowest in the district. Does this kind of success translate to the classrooms? I like to believe it does.

–Theresa Turner, Kent

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Comments | More in Your voices | Topics: discipline, your voices

November 30, 2014 at 11:00 PM

Guest: Why diversity matters in tech and engineering

Susannah Malarkey

Susannah Malarkey

Diversity in our technology and engineering workforce is a hot topic, and with good reason. Washington has the highest concentration of science, tech, engineering and math (STEM)-related jobs in the country, but the lack of women and people of color in this sector is glaringly obvious.

It isn’t enough to simply complain. We must tackle the root causes of this issue, not only for the good of individuals who will find livelihoods in this sector, but for our innovation-based industries as well.

Pursuing a career in STEM is a smart move for many students. These professions offer above-average pay and a range of fulfilling job opportunities. So why isn’t there more diversity? According to a study by the U.S. Census Department last year, African Americans hold only 6 percent of the jobs in these fields, and Hispanics only 7 percent — numbers far below their representation in the overall workforce. Women hold only 26 percent of these jobs.

In order to grow our technical workforce, the talent pool from which STEM companies find their employees must grow much more diverse. As someone who works with leaders in the tech industry, I can report that CEOs believe that diversifying their workforces is not only the right thing to do, it is also seen as a business imperative.

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Comments | More in Guest opinion, Opinion, Your voices | Topics: higher ed, STEM, Technology Alliance

November 30, 2014 at 9:01 PM

Rewind: Watch a replay of video chat on diversity in STEM education

On Tuesday, the Education Lab team hosted a Google+ Hangout about diversity in STEM and what some universities are doing to help more people of color and first-generation students earn degrees in fields like computer science and engineering.

The video chat was tied to a Monday story by Katherine Long about programs at the University of Washington and Washington State University that give disadvantaged engineering students a fifth year to complete academic prep work to put them on equal footing with those students from more privileged backgrounds.

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Comments | More in Your voices | Topics: higher education, STEM, University of Washington

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