Follow us:

Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

Topic: Compass 2 Campus

You are viewing the most recent posts on this topic.

February 14, 2014 at 10:22 AM

What you wish you’d known about college ahead of time

We received several thoughtful responses to our most recent reader question, which asked: “What do you wish you had known about college ahead of time?”

The prompt was tied to our Sunday story about how mentoring programs at Western Washington University and the University of Washington are encouraging students to pursue post-secondary education by exposing them to the idea of college at a young age. Western’s program, called Compass 2 Campus, invites younger students to ask college kids whatever they’d like about campus life; the common questions can be both easy (“Do you live with your teachers?”) and more complicated (“What if you do not have money to go to college?”) to answer.

Here are a few examples of what our readers said they wish they had known about college when they were younger. Some responses have been edited for length and grammar.

I wish I’d been taught how to study. The primary way to get a study skills class in college is when you need remedial help. But how do you remediate what’s never been taught? I learned the hard way, and I eventually got it, but if there had been a class called How to Read in College, I’d have signed up right away.

—Drego Little, Seattle

I wish I had known to do more research about my major and what it would actually do for me job-wise. I don’t use my degree for my job now, and I keep hearing about many people who take out huge school loans and graduate with few job skills. I worked my way through school, which was not fun, but at least I got out of college debt free. With recent tuition hikes, getting out debt free is much harder, and students need to make sure the loans will be worth it.

—Michelle Jones, Everett

More

0 Comments | More in Opinion, Question of the Week, Your voices | Topics: college, Compass 2 Campus, higher ed

February 10, 2014 at 9:56 AM

Chat rewind: How college students can get more kids interested in higher ed

Fifth grade students from the greater Bellingham area  are greeted by Victor-E-Viking as they arrive on campus to participate in Western Washington University's  Compass 2 Campus program. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Fifth grade students from the greater Bellingham area are greeted by Victor-E-Viking as they arrive on campus to participate in Western Washington University’s Compass 2 Campus program. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Our latest Education Lab story examines a mentor program at Western Washington University called Compass 2 Campus. As its name suggests, Compass 2 Campus operates under the premise that linking current college students with younger students can help kids navigate a path to higher education.

Several other local programs — including the University of Washington’s Dream Project — have also exposed thousands of young people to college life by connecting them with mentors and tutors.

At noon on Tuesday, Feb. 11, reporter Katherine Long, Compass 2 Campus founder Cyndie Shepard and Dream Project director Jenee Myers Twitchell answered reader questions during an hourlong live chat.

More

0 Comments | More in Your voices | Topics: Compass 2 Campus, higher ed, live chat

February 8, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Kids and college: Compass 2 Campus’ frequently asked questions

Compass 2 Campus mentor Alisa Kathol, a freshman from Mill Creek, interested in secondary education, answers students questions at Shuksan Middle School in Bellingham. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Compass 2 Campus mentor Alisa Kathol, a freshman from Mill Creek, interested in secondary education, answers students questions at Shuksan Middle School in Bellingham. Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times.

Sunday’s Education Lab story focuses on a mentoring program out of Western Washington University called Compass 2 Campus.

The main idea behind Compass 2 Campus? Convince kids that college is for them by exposing them to the idea of higher education — starting in fifth grade.

As part of the program, mentors give young students the chance to ask them anything about their college experience. Here are some examples of questions they frequently hear:

  • Do you live with your teachers? 
  • Does everybody live together at Western? 
  • What do you do at WWU?
More

0 Comments | Topics: Compass 2 Campus, mentoring, Western Washington University

February 8, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Guest: Compass 2 Campus helps new teachers navigate challenging classrooms

Stevie Olsen

Stevie Olsen

I knew I wanted to be a teacher before I started college at Western Washington University. Students at Western don’t have many opportunities to work with students until they enter the education program, and as soon as I heard about Compass 2 Campus, it became my main priority to not only get experience working with students but also to be able to give back to the community.

Looking back, I know the time I spent as a Compass 2 Campus mentor has helped me create meaningful relationships with my students as a professional teacher today.

During my time in the program, I worked with students facing the same behavioral and academic problems I see today. In my first year with Compass 2 Campus, there was a student who did not have many friends and was underperforming academically. After talking with him, he had told me he wasn’t planning on graduating and that he wanted to run his own auto shop. He and I had long conversations about how it was important to graduate and to learn math (his hardest subject) because he would have trouble running a business if he couldn’t handle money.

After working with this student for three years, he was earning all A’s and was more confident about his academics. He also turned to me to learn about technical programs that he could get involved in after high school.

Today, in my first year as a teacher, I work in a Title I school teaching a combined first- and second-grade class that includes students who are around the same academic level between first and second grade. In this setting, I must modify all of my lessons to fit the needs of my students as well as making sure they are all meeting the Common Core standards. Coming into my first year of teaching, I knew it was going to be challenging, not only because it was a split class but because this school is known to have a high teacher turnover rate.

More

0 Comments | More in Guest opinion, Opinion | Topics: Compass 2 Campus, Western Washington University

February 6, 2014 at 2:50 PM

What do you wish you would have known about college ahead of time?

WWU campus (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times 2011)

WWU campus (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times 2011)

For many young people, deciding to go to college isn’t really a decision at all. Whether it’s their parents, teachers or other role models, someone at some point makes it clear that higher education is part of their future.

The idea of college degree isn’t nearly as certain for other kids. In rural areas outside of Bellingham, for example, the percentage of high school graduates who go to college often lags the state and national average.

Our next full-length Education Lab story focuses on a mentoring program at Western Washington University called Compass 2 Campus. The idea behind Compass 2 Campus is simple: Convince kids that college is for them by exposing them to the idea of higher education — starting in fifth grade. Look for the story in print on online this Sunday, Feb. 9.

In the meantime, we’re interested to hear about readers’ own experiences surrounding higher education. Who first exposed you to the idea of college? Did you always see yourself on campus, or was it a struggle to get there? Even if you did not attend, what do you wish you would have known about college when you were younger?

More

0 Comments | More in Question of the Week, Your voices | Topics: Compass 2 Campus, higher ed, Western Washington University