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Education Lab is a project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

Topic: Dan Goldhaber

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January 15, 2015 at 5:00 AM

Russell and Marshawn are stars, but so are Kenneth and John

John Bransford

John Bransford

Kenneth Zeichner

Kenneth Zeichner

Most of us don’t follow education stars as closely as Seahawks standouts, but the Seattle area has national talent in that arena, too.  Seven Washingtonians, for example, were listed in a ranking of this year’s top 200 education researchers — no small feat, given that there are more than 20,000 of them across the country.

At no. 41, University of Washington Professor Kenneth Zeichner was the highest ranked from this state, followed by John Bransford, a UW professor emeritus, who ranked 59th.

The list was created by Frederick Hess of the American Enterprise Institute, who set out to measure scholars’ clout in broad, national debates about education, far beyond academia. To calculate the rankings, Hess used eight measures, including how frequently scholars’ books and papers are cited by colleagues, and how many times they are mentioned in general-interest newspapers and the education press. The full methodology can be found here.

Zeichner received  high scores in the academic-work-cited-by-colleagues category, but he’s also written pieces for The Washington Post, including one that challenges the fact that many low-income schools have a significant number of under-prepared teachers.   (He’s also the father of Seattle teacher Noah Zeichner, who has been featured in Education Lab as one of the nominees for a new, $1 million teaching prize.)

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Comments | More in News | Topics: Dan Goldhaber, education research, Frederick Hess

June 11, 2014 at 5:00 AM

Will California ruling on teacher seniority have an impact here?

Attorney Glenn Rothner speaks during a press conference after an L.A. County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that key job protections for California teachers violate the state's constitution. Photo by Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times.

Attorney Glenn Rothner speaks during a press conference after an L.A. County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that key job protections for California teachers violate the state’s constitution. Photo by Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times.

Some in this state have been closely watching the landmark California case in which a judge ruled on Tuesday in favor of nine students who challenged state laws governing the hiring and firing of California’s teachers.

The Los Angeles Superior Court judge struck down a number of those laws, agreeing they violated the students’ constitution rights because they helped incompetent teachers keep their jobs.

The group that helped bring the case to court, Students Matter, was quoted in The New York Times on Tuesday saying it is open to funding similar lawsuits.

At least one group says there may be interest here.

“People who are concerned about educational inequity in this state want to examine all the options around how we address inequity,” said Dave Powell, executive director of the Washington chapter of Stand for Children, an advocacy group.

“The court system is one viable way to do that. The California case puts momentum behind that idea.”

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Comments | More in News | Topics: Center for Education Data & Research, Dan Goldhaber, Dave Powell