Follow us:

Education Lab Blog

Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

Topic: round-up

You are viewing the most recent posts on this topic.

October 29, 2014 at 12:40 PM

Round-up: Reclaiming school space part of healing, Truth Needle takes on pre-K mailers

Reclaiming school space part of healing process: After the shooting last spring at Seattle Pacific University, the school remodeled Otto Miller Hall, installing new carpet and furniture. Discussions about what to do with the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School are just beginning.

State Supreme Court will determine future of charter schools (AP): Justices heard arguments Tuesday on the state’s charter-schools law, prompted by a lawsuit from a coalition of teachers, parents and community groups. The case centers around the question of whether charter schools meet the constitutional definition of “common schools.”

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 28, 2014 at 3:54 PM

Round-up: Tacoma student charged with tweeting threats, SPS will reassign Garfield teacher

Tacoma student charged with tweeting threats: A 16-year-old student at Franklin Pierce High School in Tacoma has been charged with felony harassment after allegedly threatening on social media to “shoot up”his school. The teen told police he intended the announcement as a joke.

Seattle schools stick to plan to reassign Garfield teacherDespite protests by students and staff, Seattle Public Schools says it will still reassign one teacher from Garfield High School, which is overstaffed. PTA leaders at Garfield say they disagree with the decision but do not plan a fundraising effort to keep the teacher.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 27, 2014 at 12:29 PM

Round-up: SPS mulls cost of ‘free’ downtown school, high court will hear charter-school arguments

Seattle board mulling cost of ‘free’ downtown school: The Seattle school board will vote Nov. 5 on whether it will commit to acquiring a downtown federal building and turning it into an elementary school. The district would not pay anything for the building, but it estimates that renovation costs would total around $53 million.

State high court will hear charter-school arguments (AP): The Washington State Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday on whether the state’s charter-school law is constitutional. A King County judge ruled last year that certain parts of the law were unconstitutional, and both sides opted to skip the appeals-court process and asked the Supreme Court to review the matter.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 22, 2014 at 4:04 PM

Round-up: Report finds academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill, short tenure common for schools chiefs

Report reveals academic fraud at UNC-Chapel Hill (The New York Times): An internal investigation by the University of North Carolina has uncovered new details in an academic scandal that first came to light three years ago. According to the report, two faculty members at UNC-Chapel Hill ran a “shadow curriculum” within the school’s African and Afro-American Studies department and awarded unearned grades to student athletes for nearly 20 years.

Role of curriculum is a sticking point on pre-K plans (KPLU): Curriculum is key to a “high-quality” pre-K program, say backers of Proposition 1B, the city-sponsored preschool proposal. Officials say play would have to be a central component of programs that receive city funding — but such a mandate rubs many existing preschool instructors the wrong way.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 20, 2014 at 1:48 PM

Round-up: Private tutors return to local districts, quality of words key to language skills

Federally-funded tutoring returns to Pierce County districts (The News-Tribune): Students at dozens of schools in Pierce County will qualify for free private tutoring following the loss of Washington’s No Child Left Behind waiver. The programs are scheduled to being in November, and hundreds of families in Tacoma Public Schools have already signed up, although response has been slower in some suburban districts.

Quality of words key to kids’ language development (The New York Times): The quality of verbal interaction between parents and young children is more important than the quantity of words spoken, according to an academic study presented at the White House last week. UW researcher Patricia K. Kuhl, one of the study’s authors, says she is worried that messages like “close the word gap” could oversimplify what needs to be done to prevent poorer children from lagging behind their more affluent peers.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 17, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Round-up: Janitor says 9 had access to test booklets, magazine names ‘America’s worst colleges’

Janitor says 9 people had access to Beacon Hill tests: The saga of suspicious tests at Beacon Hill International School continues, with a janitor reporting that nine people had keys to a closet where the exam booklets were stored. Seattle Public Schools has not commented on issues surrounding access to the tests.

D.C. magazine picks ‘America’s worst colleges’ (NPR): Washington Monthly has taken a different approach to the traditional college rankings list. Taking into account rates for tuition, graduation and student debt, the magazine has assembled several different lists of schools it’s labeled the “worst” in the country.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 14, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Round-up: Poll shows I-1351 with 42-point lead, UW trustee dinner meetings draw criticism

New poll shows class-size initiative with 42-point lead: I-1351, the statewide initiative that would reduce K-12 class sizes, is favored by 66 percent of respondents in a Elway Poll of 500 registered voters. Education reporter John Higgins wrote about the initiative’s cost and other concerns over the weekend.

UW dinner meetings draw criticism: A lawsuit filed by a small animal-rights group has raised questions about the University of Washington’s practice of hosting trustee dinner meetings at the president’s residence two miles south of campus. Kirkland City Council member Toby Nixon, who serves as president of the Washington Coalition for Open Government, says the meetings are “on the hairy edge of compliance” with the state’s Open Public Meetings Act.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 13, 2014 at 4:34 PM

Round-up: Most I-1351 jobs would not go to teachers, pre-K proposals square off on ballot

Most new jobs under I-1351 would not go to teachers: Initiative 1351 would lower class sizes in grades K-12 and add approximately 25,000 new jobs across the state. But only about 7,400 of those positions would go to classroom teachers, with the remainder reserved for principals, nurses, counselors and other support staff.

Pre-K proposals square off on November ballot: Seattle voters will choose between two early-learning measures this November. Proposition No. 1A is focused on improving the current preschool set-up, whereas Proposition No. 1B calls for a four-year property-tax levy to pay for a pilot program.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 9, 2014 at 4:04 PM

Round-up: U.S. News corrects ranking error, Seattle kids get to taste-test new lunch items

Survey finds most superintendents support Common Core (The Washington Post): A recent survey from the Center for Education Policy finds most school district leaders support Common Core, but a majority also said they are concerned about finding enough time and resources to properly implement the new standards. More than 200 superintendents participated in the survey.

Errors in data for U.S. News rankings (The Chronicle of Higher Education): Two colleges have advised U.S. News & World Report that they submitted incorrect figures for the 2015 “Best Colleges” ranking. One of the schools, Lindenwood University in Missouri, was added to the “unranked” category as a result of the inaccuracy.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

October 8, 2014 at 12:06 PM

Round-up: Settlement reached in Garfield field-trip case, teachers pay most of McCleary bill

Settlement reached in Garfield field-trip case: Seattle Public Schools today announced a $700,000 settlement between the district and parents of a girl who said she was raped on an overnight Garfield High School field trip in 2012. School officials did not admit any wrongdoing in the case but have revised their field-trip policies.

Teachers pay most of McCleary bill (AP): Thus far, the McCleary school-funding case has cost the plaintiffs about $4 million in attorney’s fees. A significant chunk of that money has come from the state teachers’ union.

More

Comments | More in News | Topics: round-up

Next Page »