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Education Lab is a yearlong project to spark meaningful conversations about education solutions in the Pacific Northwest.

Topic: round-up

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August 21, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Round-up: Seattle schools to review assault policies, Duncan says states can delay teacher evals

Seattle schools to review policies after alleged sexual assaultInterim Seattle Superintendent Larry Nyland announced Wednesday that senior staff will review how the district handles sexual-assault complaints following allegations that a male Garfield High School student raped a female classmate on an overnight field trip in 2012. The girls’ parents have filed a Title IX complaint, which is being investigated by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

Duncan says states can delay test-based teacher evaluations by a year (The New York Times): States can delay incorporating student test scores into teacher evaluations for a year, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced Thursday. “I believe testing issues are sucking the oxygen out of the room in a lot of schools,” Duncan wrote on his blog.

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August 19, 2014 at 2:39 PM

Round-up: Cost of raising child up to $245K, UW medicine program ranked No. 3 best in world

Cost of raising a child up to $245,340 (AP): It will cost middle-income U.S. parents nearly a quarter-million dollars on average to raise a child born in the year 2013, according to the latest projection from the Agriculture Department. The figure, which accounts for food, housing, childcare and education through age 18, is up 1.8 percent from 2012.

California teens arrested over alleged school-shooting plot (USA Today): Police say two male students, ages 16 and 17, have acknowledged they were planning to shoot three staff members and random students at South Pasadena High School in South Pasadena, Calif. The pair were arrested Monday after police received a tip from someone in the community.

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August 18, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Round-up: Two preschool measures headed to ballot, woman gets Bothell diploma 51 years later

Judge rules two Seattle preschool measures will appear on ballot: King County Superior Court Judge Helen Halpert ruled Friday that Initiative 107, which seeks better wages and training for child-care workers, and the city-sponsored preschool plan that’s backed by a property-tax levy are two alternative measures addressing the same subject. Under state law, the November ballot will direct voters to first decide whether either measure should pass and then, regardless of how they answered the first question, choose between the two options.

Former Bothell student gets diploma 51 years later: After becoming pregnant at age 17, Sandra Lantz was asked to leave Bothell High School four months shy of graduation in 1963. On Saturday, Northshore School District Superintendent Larry Francois bestowed her with a legal high-school diploma during a ceremony organized by a former classmate.

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August 15, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Round-up: Court rules state can cut pension gains, Portland’s quest for antibiotic-free chicken

Court rules state can cut previous pension gains (Crosscut): The Washington state Supreme Court issued a pair of rulings Thursday saying that the state has the right to revoke pension gains for public employees that were issued in the 1990s. Washington Education Association President Kim Mead issued a statement decrying the decision.

LA school officials push back on ‘parent trigger’ law (Los Angeles Times): California’s “parent trigger” law stipulates that parents at a low-performing school can form a majority to shut down the campus, force changes in staff or curriculum, or convert the school to a charter. But officials with the Los Angeles Unified School District say they are not subject to the rules because the district has a federal waiver linked to the requirements.

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August 14, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Round-up: Failing-school letters headed out to parents, former lunch lady takes over NEA

Failing-school letters go out to Washington parents: Parents across the state will soon begin receiving letters telling them their child’s school district is failing under No Child Left Behind. Twenty-eight districts have also prepared a second letter that argues schools are actually doing far better than the federal law suggests.

Former lunch lady takes over country’s biggest education union (The Washington Post): Lily Eskelsen García will become head of the National Education Association in three weeks. Her first priority: moving away from standardized testing.

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August 13, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Round-up: Civil-rights violations alleged in Chicago, NYC trains thousands for pre-K expansion

Feds investigate alleged civil-rights violations in Chicago (The Huffington Post): Students and parents at two majority African-American schools on Chicago’s South Side have taken legal action over what they say is an unequal level of budget cuts. At one of the schools, supporters say students are forced to take art, gym, music and Spanish classes online because they are not offered in person.

NYC trains thousands of preschool teachers for upcoming year (Chalkbeat New York): An expansion of the city’s universal pre-K program means about 4,000 instructors are receiving formal training in early education this summer, at a cost of $2.2 million.

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August 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Round-up: Seattle special-ed chief placed on leave, software lets professors see who’s zoning out

Seattle special-ed chief placed on paid leaveZakiyyah McWilliams was placed on administrative leave Friday afternoon after the district raised concerns about the hiring of a consultant last spring. Wyeth Jessee, now executive director of leadership development, will take over as interim leader of the special-education department.

Denver voters will decide whether to raise sales tax to pay for preschool (The Denver Post): The Denver City Council has voted to send a measure to voters that would increase sales tax by 3 cents per $100 to keep up with demand for subsidized preschool. The program has doled out $55 million in tuition credits to 32,000 children since its inception.

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August 11, 2014 at 2:57 PM

Round-up: Marysville overhauls special-ed program, California debates ‘yes means yes’ law

Advocates fight to keep LA family engagement program (Los Angeles Times): Financial woes are threatening the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Family Literacy Project, an effort that brings families together for classes on reading, adult education and parenting techniques. Grants funding the project have expired, leaving district officials scrambling to find a way to fund the program into the future.

Marysville overhauls special-education department (The Herald): Parents of special-needs students in Marysville will find new leadership and policies following a controversial discipline incident at an elementary school there last fall. The district’s two special-education directors resigned in February.

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August 6, 2014 at 1:36 PM

Round-up: ‘Literacy school’ helps kids at risk of being held back, Portland supt. gets 28% pay raise

‘Literacy school’ aims to help struggling N.C. students catch up (The New York Times): In North Carolina, intensive summer programs are working to help struggling students learn to read before they are held back. North Carolina is one of 14 states that adopted rules in 2012 requiring or strongly recommending schools hold back students who could not read by the end of third grade.

Portland superintendent gets 28-percent pay raise (The Oregonian): The Portland School Board voted 5-2 earlier this week to give Superintendent Carole Smith a 28-percent pay increase. Smith, who has led the district since 2007, will now make $247,000 annually.

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July 30, 2014 at 11:54 AM

Round-up: For-profit colleges get billions from GI Bill, teacher tenure heats up in NYC

For-profit colleges get billions from GI Bill (AP): As one troubled chain of for-profit colleges prepares to sell or close all its U.S. campuses, a new report from the chair of the Senate Education Committee finds for-profit schools received $1.7 billion in Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits in the 2012-13 school term. The sum represents about a quarter of the total amount paid out in GI benefits that year.

Teacher-tenure battle brewing in New York (The New York Times): Teachers in New York City are fighting back after two parent groups filed lawsuits in the wake of California’s landmark teacher-tenure ruling. The educators say tenure protects against unjust firings; critics say the laws make it difficult to remove subpar teachers from the classroom.

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