Follow us:

Field Notes

Covering the natural wonders of the Pacific Northwest

May 29, 2013 at 11:13 AM

It’s summer travel season: watch for and report wildlife on I-90

This Memorial Day weekend passed without dreadful news such as the death of a black bear killed by a car on I-90, as occurred last year at this time. (The driver sped from the scene, unharmed.) The photo from that sad event lives online if you insist, but I am not posting it here.

Work is underway on both the over and under crossings on I-90 from Lake Kacheless to Hyak that will make the highway safer both for people and for wildlife.

An elk captured by camera in a forested island in the middle of I-90 in September, 2011, last September, just west of Easton.  CREDIT: Cascades Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project

An elk captured by camera in a forested island in the middle of I-90 in September, 2011, last September, just west of Easton.
CREDIT: Cascades Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project

Be sure to check the blasting schedule on the WSDOT website or you could get stopped for hours as crews detonate the rock face where they are working.

And as you drive the I-90 corridor through Snoqualmie Pass this summer, keep an eye out for wildlife. If you see an animal, dead or alive, in your travels through the pass, report it at I-90 Wildlife Watch.

Launched in November, 2010, the wildlife watch is a citizen-based wildlife monitoring project inviting drivers to report wildlife sightings along I-90 in the Snoqualmie Pass region. The data is intended to be used by WSDOT in monitoring how wildlife are using the I-90 corridor today, and how that might change once the crossings are in place.

The results from last year’s report are in: nearly 280 animals were reported, 85 percent of them live, including deer, elk, black bears, cougars, coyotes,foxes, wolves, otters, mice, hare, raccoons, skunks, woodrats and one cow, as well as several bird species.  Raccoons were the only animals that were more often reported dead than alive. I can’t explain the cow.

And if you want to see who’s cruising around out there, take a look at the photos from remote cameras courtesy of the Cascades Citizens Wildlife Monitoring Program.

As I reported in the Seattle Times, you would never guess the profusion and diversity of wildlife just beyond the whizzing maelstrom of the interstate.

0 Comments

COMMENTS

READER NOTE: Our commenting system has changed. Find out more.

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►