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High School Sports Blog

The latest news and analysis on high-school sports around the Seattle area

December 27, 2007 at 10:17 AM

Does boys basketball need a shot clock?

Good morning everyone, I hope the holiday season has been treating you well. I wanted to start the prep blog back up with a story I came across this morning from Georgia.

The Savannah Morning News asks the question “Is it time for a shot clock in high school basketball?” (A great picture accompanies the story.)

In winter tournaments this year, Georgia has seen its share of stalling. Boys teams, without the pressure of a shot clock, can hold the ball as long as they please — sometimes for multiple minutes at a time.

Only seven states in the country have a shot clock for boys basketball. Georgia and Washington do not.

The NBA implemented a shot clock in 1954. The women’s college game started one in 1971. Men’s college basketball adopted one in 1985, trimming it from 45 seconds to 35 in 1993. Girls high-school basketball also uses a shot clock.

There are arguments to both sides of the issue. Some say a shot clock only benefits the losing team. Or the better team. Shot clock supporters want to see a more high-scoring, exciting version of the game.

Where do you stand? Should high school boys basketball be the only version of the game without a shot clock?

Morning stars

1. Chris Holmes, Franklin boys basketball — The 6-foot-2 junior wing scored 14 of his team-high 27 points in the fourth quarter to lead the undefeated Quakers to a 85-73 win over Pasadena at the Torrey Pines Holiday Classic in San Diego. Holmes was 11-of-13 from the free-throw line and added eight rebounds.

2. Paul Morse, Mercer Island boys basketball — Morse, a 6-foot-1 senior guard, scored on a putback at the buzzer to give the Islanders a 55-53 win over St. Mary’s at the Desert Heat National Invitational in California.

3. Riley Carel, Enumclaw boys basketball — The 6-foot-2 sophomore guard had a season-high 12 points, three of which came on a game-tying shot at the end of regulation to force overtime. The Hornets then outscored Westview of Beaverton, Ore., 10-6 in the extra period for the 60-56 win.

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