Follow us:

High School Sports Blog

The latest news and analysis on high-school sports around the Seattle area

August 19, 2011 at 10:42 PM

Rainier Beach’s football team is loaded on the line

When Mark Haley was asked about junior running back Marques Davis, the Rainier Beach coach needed one word: “special.”

However, while it’s nice to have a game-changer in the backfield like Davis, offensive success for the Vikings starts along the line with three upperclassmen 6 feet 5 or taller. All three weigh at least 330 pounds.

“I love running the ball, so I think that’s what we’re good for,” said 6-foot-8, 355-pound junior Leoneidas Pili. “We’ve got to focus on what we have and it will pay off.”

Pili is joined by seniors Darryl Trotter, 6-5, 357 pounds, and Taurus Niumata, 6-6, 330. The development of this group will go a long way to determining how the Vikings’ season unfolds in 2011.

“From the looks of it, it’s very good, but some of the stuff we’ve still got to work on is our speed coming off the ball,” Pili said. “Other than that, it feels pretty good to have two other big guys like me on the team.”

While they prepared for practice Friday, they looked like pillars scattered across the field. They towered over their teammates.

“We want to get our running game together, because we’ve got a big line,” Trotter said. “If we can run the ball, it will be hard for them to stop us.”

As big as this group is, Pili, Trotter and Niumata all move well for their size. During a recent interview, CBS recruiting analyst Tom Lemming said he was impressed with Trotter’s raw talent, and the senior is spending his senior year trying to refine his skills and his body.

The athleticism and room for growth these players possess makes them worth paying attention to this season.

Their development could lead to big numbers for Davis, which could create a successful season for Rainier Beach.

No matter what happens on the field, Pili, Trotter and Niumata plan to make sure they take care of each other off the field.

“During school we all make sure that we’re all doing good and staying in class because, in order for us to play, we have to have the grades, because it is called student athlete,” Niumata said. “We’re basically like brothers, that’s how close we are.”

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►