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High School Sports Blog

The latest news and analysis on high-school sports around the Seattle area

September 1, 2011 at 11:59 PM

The last time Bill Redell took on a wing-T team: ‘Never’

Sky_OC_026162[1].jpgSeattle Times photo by Jim Bates

Oaks Christian coach Bill Redell didn’t need much time to respond. When asked when the last time the Lions faced an opponent that runs the wing-T, he said, “Never.”

Then he took it one step further.

“If I knew they (Bellevue) ran the wing-T, I wouldn’t have played them,” Redell said with a laugh. “It was too late. I already signed the contract.”

While Oaks Christian is familiar with high-school football in Washington — the Lions beat Skyline, 28-25, in 2009 — Saturday’s 8:30 p.m. matchup with the Wolverines at the Mission Viejo High School Football Classic will be a new experience, one that can’t quite be simulated in practice.

“When we open up against a school like Bellevue, which is an excellent football team, very well coached, we’re not used to seeing the Delaware wing-T type of offense, so it’s hard to duplicate when you’ve got your second- and third-team guys trying to run against your first-team defense,” he said. “Obviously they’re not going to run it as well as Bellevue does.”

Redell said it could be a “shock to the system” for the Lions at the start of the game.

While the Lions are preparing to slow down the wing-T, Bellevue must contend with a team that has plenty of speed on both sides of the ball.

There’s defensive back Ishmael Adams, linebacker Carlos Mendoza, who has committed to Arizona State, and receiver Jordan Payton. All three are prime prospects. Oaks Christian also has a 6-foot-5, 245-pound tackle in Marcus Piechowski.

That group is a big reason the Lions are ranked No. 13 in the USA Today Super 25.

In addition to a familiarity with high-school football in Washington, Oaks Christian is also used to attention, after having the trio of Trevor Gretzky (Wayne Gretzky’s son), Nick Montana (Joe Montana’s son who is now at Washington) and Trey Smith (Will Smith’s son).

There isn’t quite as much attention surrounding the school these days, but they are still on TV several times a season.

“They’re not only used to it, they expect it,” Redell said. “They like it. We all like it, because a little private school like us getting all that attention makes people want to go to school here.”

When asked if he had any other thoughts on the game, Redell said, “Just tell them to take it easy on us. I’m 70 years old, I can’t handle it.”

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