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High School Sports Blog

The latest news and analysis on high-school sports around the Seattle area

August 23, 2012 at 1:10 PM

Lindbergh QB Matt Stuart faces Tommy John surgery, end of football

By MATT MASSEY

Special to The Seattle Times

This was not the dream ending Matt Stuart envisioned for his high-school football career at Lindbergh.

Stuart, one of the area’s top quarterbacks, was declared out for his senior season on Tuesday after doctors determined he would need Tommy John surgery to repair damage to the throwing elbow on his right arm.

The 6-foot-5, 240-pound Stuart, who Eagles coach Pat O’Grady is sure has broken every school passing record, is scheduled to have surgery on next Tuesday at UW Medical Center in Northgate, according to his father Jeff Stuart.

“It’s been a rough 24 to 48 hours for us,” O’Grady said of losing Stuart for the season. “He hasn’t been able to throw since the second day of practice. Matt’s a pretty private kid, and emotionally speaking, he doesn’t show that side.

“But I can tell he’s hurting.”

Stuart first began to experience soreness during summer baseball and when fall football practice opened on Aug. 15 for the Class 2A Eagles, he was only able to throw the first day without pain.

“The great irony is that Matt holds every passing record in Lindbergh history, and probably a lot in Seamount League history, and he’s never been first team all-league,” O’Grady said. “And now, his senior (season) goes by the wayside and he still won’t.”

Stuart has not received any official offers from NCAA Division 1 schools in football, but had gotten interest from Washington State, UNLV, Eastern Washington, Nebraska, Auburn and UCLA.

“I think football might be done,” said Jeff Stuart of his son’s athletic future. “He’s kind of looking toward baseball in college. His doctor (Dr. Mitchel Storey, Mariners team physician) said about 97 percent who have this procedure done, come back stronger.”

Stuart, a pitcher in baseball who played for Seattle-based Stampede Baseball Club over the summer, has no scholarship offers in baseball yet.

Tyrell Shavers will replace Stuart as the starting quarterback at Lindbergh to begin the 2012 season, according to O’Grady.

“Matt has taken virtually every snap for the last three seasons for us, so it’s tough,” O’Grady said. “Obviously, with Matt, what he really does for our offense is stretches the field vertically.

“You have to respect that he can throw the ball 60 yards down the field, and we have the speed receivers to get there too. Tyrell doesn’t throw like Matt, but he can run a little more.”

Stuart finishes his Eagles’ career with a 22-9 record in 31 starts. He threw for 4,268 yards, 53 TDs and 29 interceptions in those games, gunning for 2,101 yards, 23 TDs and 15 interceptions as a junior when the Eagles went 6-4.

Lindbergh averaged 30.6 points per game last season.

“Without have gone in, doctors think he could be ready by baseball season in the spring, but probably not to pitch,” O’Grady said.

Cam Callen, the Eagles’ top receiver and playmaker, will be eased into the lineup after undergoing surgery early in 2012 to repair a torn labrum.

Callen led the Seamount League with 678 yards receiving on 51 catches in 2011. He scored 19 touchdowns and finished with a combined 1,274 yards rushing-receiving. He was second on the team in tackles with 86 last season as a defensive back.

Callen will play mainly offense this season to guard against re-injuring his labrum, according to O’Grady. His first action will likely be the Sept. 13 league opener against Evergreen at home.

Callen is likely to miss the Eagles’ nonleague openers at West Seattle on Aug. 31 and at home versus Steilacoom on Sept. 7.

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