Follow us:

Hot Stone League

Larry Stone gives his take on a wide array of baseball issues and weighs in about the Mariners, too.

August 1, 2013 at 4:19 PM

Quite a run for the three Seager brothers

Kyle Seager with his brother, Justin, shortly after he was drafted in the 12th round by the Mariners

Kyle Seager with his brother, Justin, shortly after he was drafted in the 12th round by the Mariners

Here is today’s Mariner minor-league report.

This is a great time to be a professional baseball player with the last name Seager. There happen to be three of them — brothers from Kannapolis, N.C. – and all of them are racking up the accomplishments.

The Mariners claim two of the Seager brothers; led, of course, by oldest brother Kyle, who just finished a month of July in which he led the major leagues in batting average. Kyle hit .396 (38-for-96) with 21 runs, five doubles, six homers, 14 runs batted in and a 1.099 OPS (.464 on-base percentage, .635 slugging percentage). And that doesn’t count his bunt single in the first inning tonight in Boston that raised his overall average to an even .300.

Justin Seager, a 12th-round draft pick of the Mariners this year, has begun his pro career with Everett of the Northwest League, and is one of seven AquaSox players just named to the Northwest League Northern Division All-Star team. Everett will host the game on Aug. 6, marking the first Northwest League All-Star Game since 2004. The plan is for it to be played annually, hosted by a different NWL team each year. Other members of the AquaSox making the team were pitchers Aaron Brooks, Lars Huijer and Jose Valdiva, catcher Carlton Tanabe, and infielders D.J. Peterson¬† and Jack Reinheimer. Peterson and Reinheimer were picked as starters, though Peterson — the Mariners’ first-round draft pick this year — won’t participate because he has been promoted to Class A Clinton.

Back to Justin Seager, 21,¬† who has spent most of his time (29 games) at first base, with seven games at third base: He is hitting .247 with seven doubles, three homers and 16 RBIs. He has 43 strikeouts and just six walks in 146 at-bats, with a .662 OPS, so obviously there’s work still to be done, but he’s off to a promising start.

coreyseager

Corey Seager photo by Associated Press

Youngest brother Corey Seager, meanwhile, is soaring up the prospects lists. Corey, who turned 19 in April, was a first-round pick of the Dodgers, No. 18 overall, in 2012. Keith Law of ESPN, in his mid-season rankings update last week, moved Seager all the way up from No. 46 in the preseason to list him as the 16th-best prospect in all the minor leagues. Law wrote:

Although he’s still most likely a third baseman in the end, Seager has been the best hitter in the Midwest League since his return from a DL stint in early June, hitting .342/.439/.586 in that span. He’s going to be big — at 6-4, 215 pounds, he’s already bigger than every full-time shortstop in MLB history — but that’s going to produce plus power that makes him a potential All-Star.

Playing for the Great Lakes Loons of the Midwest League, Corey is hitting .307 with 18 doubles, three triples, 11 homers, 56 RBIs, nine stolen bases, 32 walks, 57 strikeouts (in 27o at-bats) and a .901 OPS (.382 OBP, .519 slugging).

Not bad for his first full pro season, and keeping the heat on big brother Kyle.

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►