Follow us:

Husky Football Blog

The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

October 3, 2006 at 1:21 PM

Offensive chalk talk

Another Tuesday, another weekly meeting with offensive coordinator Tim Lappano.
In general, he expressed unhappiness with the play against Arizona even though the Huskies gained 447 yards — the second-highest total of the season after the 468 against San Jose State.
“I don’t think anyone on offense walked away feeling really good about that game,” Lappano said.
In particular, he was unhappy with the scoreless second half. As we noted here earlier, Lappano said he grew a little conservative in his play-calling in the second half, in part because Isaiah Stanback threw a couple of passes that could have been picked off — one would have been a TD the other way if the defender had held on to it.
“I was trying to get the game over with,” he said.
But he also said the team executed poorly “in every area” in the second half.
As for the first-half deep passes that led to 21 points, he said “we want to take shots every game. We’re not going to let people just sit on [short routes].” He added that the team’s vertical offense began to emerge in the spring game last year and the Huskies will try to add to that as much as they can.
As for this week, he said the big emphasis is holding onto the ball. Last year, the Huskies lost two fumbles and had a punt blocked that led to a 23-point second quarter for USC and all but ended the game.
“They do a great job of stripping the football,” Lappano said. “They tackle better than any team we’ve faced this year. When they hit you, you go down. We’re going to have to lock the ball down. That’s a big-time emphasis for us this week.”
And while the running game seemed a bit revived last week, Lappano pointed out that UW still had too many third-and-longs. By his count, UW faced third-and-seven or longer on 11 of 14 third downs. That’s one reason UW was just 3 of 14 on third downs against Arizona, something Lappano says has to change.

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►