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Husky Football Blog

The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

April 6, 2009 at 1:14 PM

Sark on Brock and Salk

Among the guests on the first day of the “Brock and Salk” show on the new 710 ESPN Seattle was UW coach Steve Sarkisian.
It was a relatively short interview and mostly touched on overall program stuff and not details about specific players or anything.
Most interesting might have been his take about the offensive struggles of Saturday when the quarterbacks threw a few interceptions.
Sarkisian said going in to that practice he expected there might be some sloppy play all around since it was “the culmination of a lot of installation on offense, a lot of installation on defense, the first day in (half) pads.” He said that point in spring practice often brings with it some minor struggles on the offensive line and with the quarterbacks. “It’s pretty ordinary,” he said. “It’s not a big deal to us. The key is that we grow from that installation and it starts to slow down on both sides of the ball. The repetition of the same plays starts to occur and the knowledge of the scheme starts to get better and better and guys should start performing better and better.”
Indeed, anyone who attended each of the first three practices saw that the offense did some stuff Saturday it hadn’t done the first three days (we’re supposed to avoid getting real specific about schemes in our reports so I’ll leave it at that).
Asked the biggest area of progress so far, Sarkisian pointed to the offseason conditioning program and said “the biggest area of progress is just in our athletic ability.” He talked again of how the team emphasized getting better at moving and playing in space and with more speed and that “I think we are seeing that on film after the first three practices.”
He also reiterated that he hopes to get 75 percent of the offense and defense installed during the spring with the rest coming in the fall.
He was also asked about the structure of practice and the competitive nature of it and he said part of the thought process is to keep the players engaged that “sometimes you can get out there and it gets a little monotonous.” Having a team competition every day where there is a winner and a loser “keeps our kids into it and keeps the people who are coming to practice entertained somewhat.”
The interview ended with Sarkisian asked about his efforts at public relations such as his Twitter page. He said the image of the program has inevitably dulled a bit the last few years and that “we’re just trying to keep the buzz alive until we can get going and get out on the football field and win some games. It’s not going to take us long to get back on track so get on board.”

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