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Husky Football Blog

The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

September 30, 2009 at 3:16 PM

Nussmeier talks offense

Trying to clear out yesterday’s notebook before I fill up today’s, so I’ll pass along a few things from offensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier’s meeting with a few of us following Tuesday’s practice.
An obvious point of discussion was the play of the offense against Stanford as UW was held to a season low in points (14) and yards (290).
Nussmeier said there are some issues but that he remains optimistic.
“At times physically they got after us a little bit,” he said. “At times it was identification, that was mostly in the run game. In the passing game, we made some poor decisions with the ball, Other than that, we had our chances.”
Identification, in fact, was the key word of the day, Nussmeier saying that the major failing up front was knowing where to block.
“The identification process, getting these guys on the same page as far as where we are going, who we are targeting during the game, right now that is something we have got to continue to improve at,” he said.
“You’ve always got to get targeted in the run game. When you don’t have a veteran group, we just haven’t played a lot together, so this is a continual learning process about communication and talking to one another so that we get targeted on the right guys. It doesn’t matter what scheme you are running, you’ve got to get targeted right.”
As for the passing game, that decision-making largely boiled down to a few Jake Locker passes that were intercepted.
But Nussmeier said he didn’t think last week was a step back for Locker.
“The first one was a poor read,” Nussmeier said. “He just saw the wrong guy. That’s just getting another rep (in practice). I know this — he knows that, and the next time that happens, I will be willing to say he’ll be on the right guy. And then the second time he was just trying to create too much, taking too much on himself.” He said Locker would be reminded again this week of the pitfalls of trying to do too much.
As for Notre Dame, Nussmeier expects a lot of blitzes.
Told that Notre Dame has been estimated to blitz 75 percent of the time, Nussmeier said “that may be a little conservative. … they are a very, very aggressive defense. They are going to come after you. They have such great speed they are able to do that. They pin their ears back and they come.”

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