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Husky Football Blog

The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

June 28, 2010 at 6:00 AM

June answers, volume three

Another round. …
Q: You wrote the other day about Darius Waters not qualifying and heading to Arizona Western. Is there any official word on Chris Young?
A: From people I talked with, as of last week, there was still no completely official word on Young yet because grades were not due to be posted until the end of the week. It was not expected that Young would be eligible, but because the grades weren’t in yet, no one was yet willing to say on the record what he would be doing.
However, again, the expectation is that he won’t be eligible. One option then is to do the same as Waters and head to Arizona Western and play for a couple years, receive his two-year degree, and then maybe return to UW (though once players do not get eligible, they again become recruitable athletes). I think that’s what is expected to happen, though it sounded as if there was a chance he might try to see if there were options to get eligible later.
Q: Are the states of Colorado and Utah generally considered good football recruiting areas and does the new Pac-whatever benefit from having more exposure and access to recruits in those two states?
A: As I often do on recruiting-related questions, I defer to those who know more about it than I do. So I ran this question by Chris Fetters, the Northwest Recruiting Analyst for Scout.com.
One thing we did was a quick perusal of the numbers of D-I signees from each state last year. In general, Colorado and Utah appear similar to Washington — Utah had 19 D-I prospects last year, Washington 16 and Colorado 15.
Colorado tends to be recruited by a lot of different states, and Fetters said it’s hard to tell whether anyone would really gain an advantage there. If anything, it might just help Colorado more with kids who may have been tempted to leave the state to play on the West Coast.
As for Utah, Fetters said the big winner there could be the University of Utah. He said many recruiting battles in that state come down to BYU and Utah. With each having been members of the Mountain West Conference, there hasn’t necessarily been much separating the two (aside from some of the obvious off-field differences in the two schools). But Utah now being in the Pac-Whatever could give the Utes an edge, Fetters said.
“In the short term, Utah could really benefit from this because it gives them a possible advantage over BYU,” he said.
All for now.

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