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Husky Football Blog

The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

October 6, 2010 at 1:54 PM

ASU week questions, volume two

A look at the true freshmen, playing without fear, and more in this edition.
Q: Can you break down which of the true freshmen are playing this season and which may redshirt?
A: There are 14 true frosh playing, and now that they have played, it’s best to assume none will end up redshirting. If there are injuries to any, they could theoretically try to appeal and get the year back if the injury occurs early in the year. But at the moment, it’s best to assume that all 14 who have played will end up using this as a year of eligibility.
Those 14 are:
TB Jesse Callier — Has played in all four games and is the team’s No. 2 tailback and has 163 yards on 28 carries.
RB Zach Fogerson —- He has officially played in all four games, almost entirely on special teams, and could get a bigger role as the season wears on.
WR Kevin Smith — He has played in all four games and emerged as the No. 1 kickoff returner until dislocating his thumb against USC. He will miss a couple weeks.
TE Michael Hartvigson — He has officially played in all four games, almost solely on special teams. Another whose role could expand as the season progresses.
TE
G Erik Kohler — Has played in all four games and started the last two at left guard.
G Colin Porter — Has officially played in two games, mostly on special teams.
DE Hau’oli Jamora — Has played in all four games and had eight tackles against Nebraska and his role figures to only expand as the season progresses.
DT Sione Potoa’e — Has played in all four games and is the team’s sack leader with 1.5.
MLB Garret Gilliland — Has played in all four games and got the start against Nebraska when Cort Dennison was out.
OLB Cooper Pelluer — Has played in all four games, mostly on special teams.
OLB Princeton Fuimaono — Has played in all four games, mostly on special teams.
SS Sean Parker — Has played in all four games, mostly on special teams, but also has seen time in nickel packages. Is the backup and heir apparent to Nate Williams.
S Taz Stevenson — Has played in three of four games and is back to safety after spending some time at tailback. Has played mostly on special teams.
CB Greg Ducre — Has played in all four games as a backup and on special teams. Had an interception against Syracuse and two tackles against USC.
Barring significant injuries that would cause the team to have dig deep into the depth, every other true frosh this year should redshirt including Josh Shirley. Shirley did not make the trip to USC and has not played this season.
Q: Since Steve Sarkisian is on the sideline and his view of the schemes is limited, is the OC up in the box checking those out? What process do they use for that? I’m no football coach but it seems like it would be really difficult to call plays from the sideline with such a nominal view of the schemes, so I was just curious how it works.
A: Yes, offensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier is up in the press box — Sarkisian has called him his “eye in the sky.” Sarkisian is in constant communication on his head phones, as you can see on game day, with Nussmeier and other coaches who are up in the box. Sarkisian called plays during his USC days from on the field, as well, so he’s got a lot of experience doing it.
Q: What are your thoughts on this whole “playing without fear” being the answer to some of the Huskies issues this year? It seems like a bit of a cliche Sark is throwing out there just to get the guys mentally in a better place, but can that really be a difference maker in a season? Seems too simple.
A: Without really being inside the head of each and every guy, it’s hard to really know for sure. With something as big and complicated as a football team, I think it’s always risky to assume that all 70 guys, or however many are suited up that day, will respond the same to anything. But many players insisted it made a difference — and something made a lot of guys play better on Saturday. And obviously just about every coach who has ever blown a whistle has put a lot of importance into different motivational tactics — from the days of “Win One for the Gipper” on up. What coaches will generally tell you is that the biggest thing is setting a tone for the team during the week of practice, to make sure everyone is prepared right. I think a lot of what UW did was aimed at that — getting everyone back in a good place to prepare for USC followinig what happened against Nebraska. And obviously, what also helped is that USC isn’t as good as Nebraska — and may not even be one of the top five teams in the Pac-10 when it’s all said and done. But it’s like just about anything in life — if they all thought it helped, then it probably did.
Q: How common is it for a place kicker to leave early for the NFL? Could it be that arguably our largest offensive weapon for next year might not be around next year?
A: I’m assuming you are referring to Erik Folk, and while I think we’d all agree Folk has done a great job kicking this year, I’m not sure I’d call him UW’s “largest offensive weapon.” I’m also not sure I’ve ever heard of a kicker leaving early for the NFL and I certainly wouldn’t worry about that in the case of Folk. Kickers rarely get drafted high enough for that to even be a consideration and I don’t think it will be here.
All for now.

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