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The latest news and analysis on the Montlake Dawgs.

April 24, 2014 at 1:54 PM

NCAA board endorses more power for big schools

A significant development today in Indianapolis, where the NCAA’s Board of Directors endorsed a restructuring process that would give more autonomy to the Power 5 conferences: the Pac-12, ACC, Big 12, Big Ten and SEC.

Here’s the full release from the NCAA.

And here’s the early report from The Associated Press:

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The NCAA’s board of directors endorsed a proposal Thursday giving schools in the five largest football conferences more autonomy and more voting power in changing rules within the organization.

The changes would allow the wealthiest schools to adopt some legislation on their own, including provisions for money beyond what current scholarships cover, up to the full cost-of-attendance, expanded insurance coverage and money to help families travel to NCAA tournaments.

The proposal would affect the 65 schools in the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC.

NCAA President Mark Emmert supports the move. A formal vote is expected in August. If passed then, the transition could begin this fall.

The board also approved allowing schools to provide unlimited meals and snacks to athletes.

Sports Illustrated’s Stewart Mandel laid out the possibilities for such a shift after an NCAA seminar in January. An excerpt:

While not as radical as establishing an entirely new division, as was briefly bandied about last summer, the Power 5 commissioners are seeking a means for their schools — some of which have annual athletic budgets of more than $100 million — to push through certain measures without needing approval from Division I’s lower-revenue schools. Their primary cause is “student-athlete welfare” — issues like the ability to provide cost-of-attendance scholarship stipends or pay for former athletes to return to school to finish their degrees.

“We have different resources, different goals,” said SEC commissioner Mike Slive. “We need to be able to use those resources in the best interest of our institutions and our athletes.”

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