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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

February 15, 2008 at 10:03 AM

The morning after

Not that you may want to read anymore about this one, but here’s my game story and notebook.
The Eugene Register-Guard points out that other than the three-pointers, Oregon really wasn’t all that sharp offensively. The RG also has a story on Ryan Appleby and the more PC treatment he received last night.
The Oregonian story also focuses on the three-point shooting.
UW now plays Oregon State, which lost its 14th in a row last night. OSU has also lost 14 straight Pac-10 games dating to last season. The last win, ominously enough, came against UW last February in Corvallis.
I got one e-mail pointing out that I didn’t make mention of the officiating in anything I wrote last night.
Certainly, the numbers favored Oregon —- the Ducks were 15-26 at the free throw line, UW 6-9.
UW coach Lorenzo Romar noted later that the game was called differently than the UCLA win on Sunday, when a lot of the Huskies thought the fact that the officials let a lot more go helped them. “We were definitely whistled every time we fouled (against Oregon),” Romar said.
UW was called for 22 fouls to Oregon’s 15. But worth nothing is that the last five fouls of the game were called against UW, all in garbage time after the outcome had been long settled. UW had nine fouls in the first half, Oregon seven.
The Ducks were also the more aggressive team much of the night, driving into the paint more than the Huskies so it would make sense they’d go to the line more.
And it’s always a matter of perspective. Bad as UW fans might have felt the officiating was, Oregon fans felt the same — the officials were booed off the court at halftime.
That said, there were, in my view, a few bad calls, one of which hurt the Huskies — the second foul on Jon Brockman at the 15:07 mark on an offensive rebound. He had to sit for a few minutes. But Brockman got only one other foul from there.
A few of you have asked whether there is a big difference in fouls at home and on the road, and I’ll try to break that down statistically in terms of UW later to see what the numbers show.
I would say that home teams tend to play with more energy, intensity, etc., so it would make sense if they would commit fewer fouls (not having to reach as much, etc.).
Also, the reality last night is that UW was almost better off putting Oregon at the line than letting the Ducks shoot a three — Oregon’s 56 percent on threes (14-25) was almost as good as its 57.7 on free throws.

Comments | Topics: UCLA

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