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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

February 12, 2010 at 10:56 AM

Friday morning links and Tie-Breaking Procedures

Stanford fell behind by 18 points to Washington State, but rallied in the second half and needed an 18-footer from Jeremy Green with 4.6 seconds left to escape with a 60-58 victory. The Cardinal are 5-0 a Maples Pavilion.
AROUND THE PAC-10:
— Coach Ken Bone told the Spokesman-Review: “I felt we just kind of collapsed. … We had careless turnovers, careless fouls, not as good of shot selection as early in the game, our defensive rotations were not as good. Unfortunately, we just kind of collapsed.”
— Here’s how UW 93-81 defeat looked from a Cal perspective. All Hail Jerome Randle.
Jerren Shipp had 11 points, six rebounds and three assists off the bench in helping Arizona State to a 56-46 win over Oregon State at Wells Fargo Arena.
— If you think the Huskies have got it bad, then take solace in the misery Beavers fans are feeling this morning. Oregon State connected on 14 of 57 field goals (.246 percent), which was the lowest field goal percentage by an ASU Pac-10 opponent in 23 years.
— Check out the picture in the Arizona Daily Star of Wildcats freshman Derrick Williams dunking Oregon’s Teondre Williams. That pretty much sums up Arizona’s 70-57 victory.
— Very little went right for the Ducks in this misadventure. The Register-Guard wrote: “Oregon was simply deficient in so many areas.”
TIE-BREAKING PROCEDURES:
A few folks asked about the tie-breaking rules. Well, here they are. It’s not as complicated as it seems.

Tie-Breakers: Tie breaking procedures for determining tournament seeding will follow the following procedure:
1. Two-team tie
a. Results of head-to-head competition during the regular season.
b. Each team’s record vs. the team occupying the highest position in the final regular standings, and then continuing down through the standings until one team gains an advantage.
When arriving at another group of tied teams while comparing records, use each team’s record against the collective tied teams as a group (prior to that group’s own tie-breaking procedure), rather than the performance against individual tied teams.
c. Won-lost percentage against all Division I opponents.
d. Coin toss conducted by the Commissioner or designee.
2. Multiple-team tie
a. Results of collective head-to-head competition during the regular season among the tied teams.
b. If more than two teams are still tied, each of the tied team’s record vs. the team occupying the highest position in the final regular season
standings, and then continuing down through the standings until one team gains an advantage.
When arriving at another group of tied teams while comparing records, use each team’s record against the collective tied teams as a group
(prior to that group’s own tie-breaking procedure), rather than the performance against individual tied teams.
If at any point the multiple-team tie is reduced to two teams, the two-team tie-breaking procedure will be applied.
c. Won-lost percentage against all Division I opponents.
d. Coin toss conducted by the Commissioner or designee.

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