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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

June 9, 2010 at 6:38 PM

How Would A Pac-16 Conference Affect Basketball?

Bud Withers is reporting the Pac-10 will likely add six Big 12 teams to the conference and expand to 16 teams.
The move would become effective for start of the 2012 season.
Apparently, Nebraska is poised to accept an invitation from the Big Ten, which for some reason spells the end of the Big 12.
Orangebloods.com, a Rivals site, was the first to break the news of the Big 12 demise last week and it has been all over this story.
The Los Angeles Times is also reporting the Pac-10 will soon go away and grow into something else.
There’s some concern about how a 16-team conference would work for basketball. Currently, the Big East is the only conference with 16 schools and it lumps everyone in one division. Reviewing past schedules of Big East teams there’s no rhyme or reason to the schedules.
I spoke with a East Coast writer who covers the conference and he said the Big East likes to preserve traditional rivalries for home and away games, while making sure every team plays each other at least once during an 18-game conference schedule.
Former San Francisco Chronicle college writer Jake Curtis has examined possible scheduling scenarios on his blog Jake’s Take on Sports and hypothesized Pac-16 teams would likely play each at least once while keeping the traditional rivals for home-and-away contests.
In Washington’s case that means two games against Washington State each season and a home-and-away format against two other schools would rotate.

The Super 16 conference might put all 16 teams in one big division, like the Big East. So let’s start with the premise that every conference team would play each conference opponent at least once. That’s 15 games right there, enough for an entire conference season. The ACC and Big 12 play only 16 conference games now. Where games are played would be critical. If, for example, Cal plays UCLA and Texas at home and Oregon and Washington State on the road, it has a chance to sweep all four. If the sites were reversed, a split is probably the best-case scenario.
A more likely scenario is that the conference would keep an 18-game conference schedule, which means playing three conference opponents twice. That’s what the Big East does. Playing Texas twice is a lot different from playing Washington State twice.
Producing a schedule or format that is fair will be a chore, probably impossible.
— Jake Curtis

Comments | Topics: UCLA

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