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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

March 9, 2011 at 1:26 PM

Husky AD Scott Woodward: “This is a teachable moment”

Flew to Los Angeles this morning on the same flight as Washington athletic director Scott Woodward. We talked for a bit in the baggage claim area at LAX about the events of the past 24 hours.
Here’s the interview:
(What are you thoughts on what happened yesterday?) “I back Coach (Lorenzo) Romar 100 percent. Coach is not only a coach, but more importantly he’s a parent and he’s a teacher. And that’s the most important thing that we can take from this with all of our student-athletes. It’s a lesson learned. Assuming that all of these reports are correct, the best thing that we can do is make this a teachable moment. Also punish, but more importantly make it a point to get our kids to understand certain things are not acceptable and certain actions are not to be taken lightly.”
(Venoy Overton has not been convicted of anything. Is his suspension an admission of guilt or does it speak to a different matter?) “It’s speaking to something else. Because you’re right. We haven’t gone through the legal process. He’s just been charged. He hasn’t been convicted yet and we’ll see where that goes. But from what we’re gathering and what we know and what we’ve been able to ascertain, I think coach Romar has handled this very well.”
(Did you talk with Romar about the length of the penalty?) “Coach and I had discussions about what and how he was going to do it. We didn’t go back and forth. Coach is pretty solid in usually his opinion and how he views things. His track record has been very good.”
(Romar is responsible for a dozen guys on a basketball team, but you oversee an athletic department with hundreds of student-athletes. What message do you tell them about the Overton incident?) “Like I said earlier, this is a teachable moment. The most important thing is we’re not going to try to win the press conference. We’re going to be worried about fixing the problem if it is a behavioral problem with our student athlete. We would rehabilitate them and help them to figure out that there’s certain things you do and certain things you don’t do. And that’s the most important thing that we can as administrators and coaches teach our kids.”

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