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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

April 12, 2011 at 7:03 AM

Is college basketball broken?

Watch the full episode. See more FRONTLINE.

Lowell Bergman of PBS’s Frontline snags an interview with NCAA president Mark Emmert and takes an in-depth look at college basketball. Particularly he examines the billions of dollars of revenue the sport generates and takes a look at how the money is distributed among coaches, players and universities. The NCAA has a 14-year contract that’s worth $700 million annually.
Here’s a transcript of that interview in which Emmert says: “Division I men’s basketball generates about 96 percent of the revenue that flows into and gets distributed out to the institutions through the NCAA. So it is by far the dominant revenue stream for the NCAA membership.”
In Bergman’s piece titled “Money and March Mardness” he talks to Sonny Vaccaro, who started the AAU summer circuit, and a host of college basketball observers who believe the sport is irrevocably broken.
Bergman also talks to former UCLA star Ed O’Bannon who led the Bruins to a 1995 national championship and was the player of the year that season. O’Bannon, who works at a Las Vegas car dealership, is suing the NCAA for use of his likeness in video games.
It’s a fascinating look at the sport many of us love. It repeatedly asks the question: Should some student-athletes receive monetary benefits beyond their scholarships?
That’s a subject that HBO’s Real Sports tried to tackle in their latest report and they did an amazing job as well. You can watch Bryant Gumbel, Bernie Goldberg and Andrea Kremer talk about the piece below.
Bergman’s video is broken in three parts. Here’s Part 1 (above) and the rest is below.

Watch the full episode. See more FRONTLINE.

Watch the full episode. See more FRONTLINE.

Comments | Topics: top 25, UCLA

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