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Husky Men's Basketball

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February 14, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Lorenzo Romar: “Every game is crucial”

Not a whole lot of news coming out Lorenzo Romar’s press conference today.
With five games left, Washington is at the top of the Pac-12 standings, but the Huskies know they have a lot of work to do win conference championship and secure a NCAA tournament berth.
“If we’re talking about getting to the NCAA tournament and winning this conference, every game is crucial,” Romar said. “We have to be at our best from here on out. Can’t have a setback. Can’t have a game like we did at Oregon from here on out. We have to be at our best.
“We have to just constantly remind our guys, we have to talk about how important today’s practice is. How important each drill is. One little setback could possibly keep us from reaching our goals at this point.”
Sophomore guard C.J. Wilcox (hip) is able to take 150 shots each day in practice, which is an increase from the 50 he was allowed two weeks ago. Trainers still do not allow him to participate in team drills.
Romar drew similarities between last Sunday’s Oregon State win and victory at Arizona State on Jan. 26. In both contests, the Huskies “scratched and clawed” to overcome shoddy shooting.
When asked if this season is his best coaching performance, Romar said: “This is probably the most adversity in terms of injuries that we have faced.”
Romar said junior guard Abdul Gaddy is seventh in the Pac-12 in minutes played and averages 33.6 minutes because the Huskies are relatively thin in the back court.
Romar talked about seniors Darnell Gant and Brendan Sherrer. It’s been a UW tradition to start seniors on Senior Night and Gant will probably return to the lineup Saturday against Arizona. Romar was unwilling to say if Sherrer, a three-year walk-on who has logged 15 minutes this season, would start or even play.


During Monday’s weekly radio show, Romar said he’s still amazed at Sherrer’s story and how he came out of the Dawg Pack and won a spot on the team during a tryout. Romar likened Sherrer’s fan appeal to former UW walk-on Zane Potter.
Romar noted the 10-minute delay in the Oregon game that occurred when the ball boys, officials and janitors had difficulty cleaning up an ice cream spill allowed Terrence Ross to catch his breath. Romar said the sophomore guard was “exhausted and lost the ball twice on consecutive” possessions before the long break.
Ross is third in the Pac-12 and first among the Huskies with a 7.5 rebounding average in Pac-12 games.
Romar reiterated Ross is UW’s go-to guy, especially in the closing minutes.
Romar acknowledged Washington was burned on an inbound play and said the Huskies were trying to force the ball into the corner where they could trap.
Against zone teams like Arizona State and Oregon, Romar said he’ll call several sets during the game, but often it requires players to read the defense and make proper plays.
“You try to run a motion,” he said. “We try to go in and out. A lot of people think you got to make sure you knock down your outside shots against a zone and that really helps, but you got try to get the ball inside on the low block or in the middle of the key.
“Sometimes you don’t have the personnel that can be effective even if they get the ball in there. We’ve had teams where we had Brandon Roy, Jamaal Williams and Quincy Pondexter. You get the ball to those guys, they’re going to make you pay. Terrence Ross and Tony Wroten are probably the guys that are best at it right now. But we try to move those guys in and out. Play inside and out basketball, but there are sets that we run.”
And finally Romar touched on the passing of former Saint Louis coach Charlie Spoonhour, who died Feb. 1.
“One of the greatest coaches ever,” Romar said. “Did a lot more with less talent than most coaches ever had. Was just a great person also. He really could have had his own comedy routine. He was hilarious. You’d hear him speak and he’d go on for an hour and the whole place would just have a side ache because he’s that funny of a guy. He was really beloved in St. Louis and all of Missouri and all of the coaching fraternity because he was just an old-school guy that knew how coach and knew how to make you feel good about yourself. You just felt a little better about yourself when you were around Charlie.”
(How difficult was it to follow him at Saint Louis?) “You don’t follow it. It’s Spoonball. It was everywhere. No one really could matchup to him.Whitey Herzog was the manager for the Cardinals and him and Charlie Spoonhaur had the white, grayish hair. They were two of kind. They kind of went hand in hand and everybody cheered them on. Spoon had a lot of success. It was the first time since the 1950s that Saint Louis had any success at all and Spoonball brought that on. It was very difficult to follow.”

Comments | Topics: Abdul Gaddy, C.J. Wilcox

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