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April 12, 2012 at 10:38 AM

Former UW coach Tippy Dye passes away

tippy dye and team.jpg
Tippy Dye, who coached Washington to its only NCAA Final Four appearance, passed away Wednesday afternoon in Northern California. He was 97.
“It was very peaceful,” said his daughter Penny Carnegie.
Born April 1, 1915 in Harrisonville, Ohio, William Henry Harrison Dye was named after the country’s ninth president, a general and hero in the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe.
When Harrison campaigned for president in 1840, his running mate was John Tyler, and their motto was: “Tippecanoe and Tyler too.” And the nickname was born.
He was a three-sport athlete at Ohio State and after serving three years in the Navy during World War II, he returned to OSU and coached the Buckeyes to a 53-34 basketball record, with a conference championship in 1950.
The next year, he took a job at Washington, where he was paid $12,500.
In his first season, he led UW to a 24-6 record. The next year the Huskies were 25-6.
During the 1952-53 season, Dye guided them to a 28-3 record. Washington was the favorite to win the national title but lost 79-53 to Kansas in the semifinals. The Huskies then beat LSU 88-69 to finish third.
After nine years, he resigned in 1959 with a 156-91 record. He left coaching and served as athletic director at Wichita State, Nebraska and Northwestern before retiring in 1974.
Dye ranks fourth on Washington’s all-time win list behind Clarence “Hec” Edmundson (488-195), Marv Harshman (246-146) and Lorenzo Romar (219-113).
“He left an unbelievable legacy with this program, but more so with his players,” Romar said in a 2010 interview. “Talking to his players and those that watched the program, they might say: ‘Tippy would never let that fly,’ or ‘Tippy would do it this way.’
“This is 50 years later and they still have the utmost respect for him, and the little time that I spent with him, I can see why.”
Dye is survived by his daughter Stephanie ‘Penny’ Carnegie; son William HH Type Dye III; son-in-law Roger Carnegie; four grand daughters Mary Haase, Laura Carnegie, Mary Dye, Jody LaLoup and four great grandsons Ryan Haase, Braydon and Parker LaLoup and Daniel Finnie.
“He was gentle and kind,” Penny Carnegie said. “He loved people. He really taught me what living was and he taught me about dying. He and my mother really gave me my faith. They were people who gave self-esteem to other people.”

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