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Husky Men's Basketball

The latest news and analysis on Husky men's hoops.

April 29, 2013 at 10:43 AM

Pac-12 loses Andre Roberson, Ahmad Starks

Colorado junior Andre Roberson, the Pac-12′s defensive player of the year, is turning pro while Oregon State junior guard Ahmad Starks has decided to transfer.

Here’s a look at the Pac-12 underclassmen who declared for the NBA draft and those who considered leaving, but chose to return to school.

GOING TO NBA
Allen Crabbe, California
Grant Jarrett, Arizona
Shabazz Muhammad, UCLA
Andre Roberson, Colorado
DeWayne Dedmon, USC

STAYING IN SCHOOL
Kyle Anderson, UCLA
Jahii Carson, Arizona State
Devon Collier, Oregon State
Spencer Dinwiddie, Colorado
Eric Moreland, Oregon State
Dwight Powell, Stanford
C.J. Wilcox, Washington

And here’s a look at players who are transferring out of the Pac-12.

Jeremy Adams, Colorado
Martin Breunig, Washington
Glen Dean, Utah
Aaron Dotson, Utah
Bryce Leavitt, Washington State
Willie Moore, Oregon
Kaileb Rodriguez, California
Justin Seymour, Utah
Tyler Sugiyama, USC

So far not there aren’t many big names leaving the conference. Still it’s interesting to note Utah is losing Dean and Dotson, two Seattle-area high school standouts who transferred to Utah two years ago.

AROUND THE PAC-12:

Nice feature on Arizona incoming freshman Aaron Gordon.

— Fantastic weekend for a pair of former UW Huskies. Nate Robinson scored 34 points, including 23 in the fourth quarter, to lead Chicago to a thrilling 142-134 triple-overtime victory and a 3-1 series lead over Brooklyn. Meanwhile, Quincy Pondexter added 10 points off the bench to help Memphis to a 104-83 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers that evened their first-round playoff series at 2-2.

— In a first-person account on SI.com, former Stanford player Jason Collins disclosed that he is gay, making him the first active openly homosexual athlete in the four major American pro team sports. The 34-year-old NBA player wrote: “I didn’t set out to be the first openly gay athlete playing in a major American team sport. But since I am, I’m happy to start the conversation. I wish I wasn’t the kid in the classroom raising his hand and saying, “I’m different.” If I had my way, someone else would have already done this. Nobody has, which is why I’m raising my hand.”

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