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October 24, 2013 at 6:44 PM

Former UW star Reggie Rogers found dead

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Reggie Rogers celebrates after he sank the winning free throw that beat Duke 80-78 in the NCAA tournament on March 18, 1984.

Former Washington Huskies two-sport star Reggie Rogers was found dead in his home in Seattle on Thursday afternoon. He was 49.

Here is the link to our story.

Rogers was was an All-American defensive lineman who played at UW from 1984-86. The 6-6, 278-pounder also starred on the men’s basketball team for three seasons.

In 1987, Rogers was a first-round draft pick (seventh overall) by the Detroit Lions, but his career was shortened due to substance abuse and tragedy. In 1988, he killed three teenagers in a drunk driving accident and spent 16 months in prison for vehicular homicide. Rogers suffered a broken neck in the accident, but returned to play two more seasons in the NFL with Buffalo and Tampa Bay. His last season was 1992.

Since his retirement, he’s been arrested for a string of DUIs, assault and other criminal traffic violations.

In December 2011,  he was sentenced to a year in jail for his sixth conviction for drunken driving following an arrest in Tacoma.

Rogers was arrested earlier this month on a domestic violence charge after police were called to his home on 15th Avenue South by his wife, who reported that Rogers had hit her. He pleaded not guilty to charges in Seattle Municipal Court.

One of Rogers’ children is daughter Regina Rogers, who was an All-American center for the Huskies women’s basketball team as a senior in 2012.

Rogers was the younger brother of Don Rogers, an All-American safety at UCLA and NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year with the Cleveland Browns, who died in 1986 at age 23 of a heart attack caused by cocaine overdose while Reggie was attending the UW.

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