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December 18, 2013 at 9:37 AM

Morning links: Former UW star Reggie Rogers died from substance abuse

Reggie Rogers smiles after slamming over USC in 1984. (Photo credit: Kyle Keener - Seattle Times)

Reggie Rogers smiles after slamming over USC in 1984. (Photo credit: Kyle Keener – Seattle Times)

The death of former Washington two-sport standout Reggie Rogers has been linked to substance abuse.

The King County Medical Examiner’s Office said Tuesday that Rogers’ death in October was due to a combination of cocaine and alcohol intoxication. Officials determined his death was accidental.

Rogers was was an All-American defensive lineman who played football at UW from 1984-86. The 6-6, 278-pounder also starred on the men’s basketball team for three seasons.

In 1987, Rogers was a first-round draft pick (seventh overall) by the Detroit Lions, but his career was shortened due to substance abuse and tragedy. In 1988, he killed three teenagers in a drunk driving accident and spent 16 months in prison for vehicular homicide. Rogers suffered a broken neck in the accident, but returned to play two more seasons in the NFL with Buffalo and Tampa Bay. His last season was 1992.

One of Rogers’ children is daughter Regina Rogers, who was an All-American center for the Huskies women’s basketball team as a senior in 2012.

Rogers was the younger brother of Don Rogers, an All-American safety at UCLA and NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year with the Cleveland Browns, who died in 1986 at age 23 of a heart attack caused by cocaine overdose while Reggie was attending the UW.

WEDNESDAY MORNING LINKS:

Big test for Stanford (7-2) which travels to No. 10 Connecticut (9-0) and will try and snaps the Huskies 54-game home winning streak against non-conference opponents. The game is also the first collegiate meeting between Cardinal guard Chasson Randle and UConn’s Ryan Boatright who were selected co-Illinois Mr. Basketball in 2011.

Two factors could help Stanford. The game tips off at 9 p.m. ET and UConn has had a 12-day layoff.

— It’s the first of two consecutive games against Pac-12 teams for Connecticut, which plays at Washington on Sunday.

— And speaking of Stanford, senior guard Aaron Bright, who suffered a season-ending shoulder injury, plans to transfer. He’s going to apply for a medical waiver, but the Cardinal have committed four scholarships for next season and there’s no room on the roster for the former Bellevue High star.

— So far, four Pac-12 players have announced plans to transfer, including Washington junior Hikeem Stewart.

— Oregon State (5-2) gets a chance to avenge last year’s overtime upset at home to Towson (7-4), which returns to Gill Coliseum.

— No. 13 Oregon forced 19 turnovers and collected 13 steals to power past UC Irvine for a 91-63 win that improved its record to 10-0 for the first time since 2006. Joseph Young scored 18 points, Mike Moser added 15 and Dominic Artis chipped in five points and eight rebounds in his first game since returning from a nine-game suspension.

— Oregon has taken full advantage of the new hands-off defensive rules. The Ducks get to the free throw line, which is part of the reason for their success.

— SI.com’s weekly Wooden Watch takes a look at Arizona State’s Jahii Carson. The list also includes UConn’s Shabazz Napier.

— Colorado lost Andre Roberson, who led the nation in rebounding last season before leaving early for the NBA, but Xavier Johnson is helping to fill the void.

On this day 93 years ago, Hec Edmundson made his Washington debut in 1920 with a 30-14 decision over Varsity/Alumni en route to becoming the Huskies’ all-time winningest coach.

— Not Pac-12 related, but Southern Illinois coach Barry Hinson is the talk of college basketball today after his epic postgame rant. Here’s the video (below). Hinson is unapologetic for his remarks.

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