Follow us:

Jon Talton

Analysis and commentary on economic news, trends and issues, with an emphasis on Seattle and the Northwest.

March 8, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Women and economic progress, in the developing and advanced world

For International Women’s Day, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has put together some telling information about women in the developing world. For example, women produce some 80 percent of the food in Africa but own only 1 percent of the farmland. Women in the developing world are 5 times less likely than men to own land, and their farms tend to be smaller and less fertile.

Women are less like to have access to financing to make their farms more productive. The same is true for their ability to leverage technology and expert knowledge. In addition to the farmwork, women are charged with caring for children, cooking and cleaning — this takes up about six hours a day. Address this, the foundation says, and global hunger could be reduced by 150 million people, along with giving women more disposable income and reducing dependency on foreign aid. You can read about the foundation’s so-called gender responsive agriculture programs here.

Meanwhile in the United States, here are Working Mother magazine’s 10 best companies for women’s executive advancement (none in our region); the best firms for multicultural women, and the best companies for hourly workers.

The region’s big firms also don’t crack Forbes’ list of the to 50 companies for women. Abbott Laboratories is at the top. CNN/Money’s list of the companies with the most female employees includes the Everett Clinic, Nordstrom and Starbucks ranking high.

Finally, the Economic Policy Institute parses the numbers from the dramatic cutbacks in state and local governments. The biggest losers: Women.

And Don’t Miss: Ties that bind oil and the dollar snap || Wall Street Journal

Today’s Econ Haiku:

Oh, Dow 13K

A long hike through oil and Greece

And still not there yet

Comments | More in International Women's Day

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►